How To Quit Your Job

22.08.2023 0 Comments

How To Quit Your Job
Key Takeaway – Here’s how to quit a job gracefully:

  • Keep quiet. Don’t tell coworkers you plan to quit before you tell your boss.
  • Quit in person. Don’t quit by email or by phone. Your employer will appreciate your professionalism.
  • Give two weeks’ notice. More is better. Don’t leave your boss in the lurch.
  • Write a letter of resignation. Turn it in after you quit in person. Say something positive about the job—even if you hated it.

Still not sure how to quit your job? What scares you most? Did you write a really great resignation letter that you’d like to share with us? Leave a comment! We’d be happy to reply!

Is it OK to just quit your job?

How to be professional when quitting without notice – Quitting without notice can and should be done professionally. Just because you aren’t giving two weeks’ notice doesn’t mean you can’t leave on good terms. Professionalism and kindness go a long way. Unless you’re escaping a toxic or unsafe workplace, be sincere and respectful of other people’s emotions. Keep these tips in mind when delivering the news:

  • Share your decision with your boss directly, not through coworkers. They should hear it from you personally
  • Regulate your emotions — don’t raise your voice. Speak calmly and avoid inappropriate or unprofessional language
  • Do what you can to leave on a positive note. Be as helpful as possible in your final hours, and say goodbye to your coworkers
  • Be honest about why you’re leaving
  • When possible, give honest feedback in exit interviews or surveys

How do I quit my job in the Netherlands?

Resigning from a job – Should you decide to resign your job during the term of your employment, you will need to give written notice of your intention to leave. You must take the notice period in your contract into account. If you have a fixed-term (temporary) contract, then neither you nor your employer can end the employment earlier than the end date unless the contract includes a clause that provides for your earlier resignation and notice period.

Should I quit my job if I am unhappy?

1. It Just Isn’t Sustainable – If you find yourself in a situation in which it is emotionally, physically, or mentally draining ( or worse ) for you even to show up to work, let alone get excited and perform at a high level—you need to leave. It might be due to unsupportive co-workers, an unattentive supervisor, a commute that is destroying all of your personal time, or an unfair workload that is impossible to handle.

But whatever the cause, realize that professional development and confidence compound over time—so it’s critical to keep your career momentum moving, rather than getting stuck in a bad situation. This also includes being systematically underpaid, If you are slowly (but definitively) running out of runway because you have a job that doesn’t pay you well enough, you don’t want to wait until that runway dissolves entirely, at which point it will be much more difficult to move on.

In many situations, there are ways to change these factors—transferring to a new department, picking up a new project, or asking for a raise, for example. But assuming you’ve tried to make the best of the situation and those attempts haven’t been successful, don’t feel bad about doing what you have to do to take care of yourself.

What is quiet quitting?

Quiet quitting is when employees continue to put in the minimum amount of effort to keep their jobs, but don’t go the extra mile for their employer. This might mean not speaking up in meetings, not volunteering for tasks, and refusing to work overtime. It might also result in greater absenteeism.

Can hating your job cause anxiety?

(Photo: iStock) Commute, work, repeat—it’s an algorithm that resets day after day, week after week, year after year. For most of us, work is a necessity to live. And, considering that we spend one-third of our lives at work, it’s worth trying to break that feeling that you’re an automaton rather than an actual living, breathing being.

It’s not just our intuition that tells us this, science backs it up. Study after study shows that the effects of job unhappiness can impact your overall mental health, causing problems with sleep, anxiety, and depression. Of course, quitting or getting a new job overnight may not be realistic, but you can work toward being happier at the job you have.

And that has some serious perks. “Being happier at work makes us more engaged, interested, creative, and resilient, which ultimately can lead to better service, sales, and profitability,” says Keynote Speaker & Corporate Trainer, Eric Karpinski, M.B.A., author of the upcoming book: Put Happiness to Work,

Why is it so hard to quit a job I hate?

Fear – There are many concerns, worries and fears that might be holding you back from quitting the job you hate. It’s natural for people to fear change or uncertainty. Quitting your job means letting go of the familiar and entering into the unknown. If you view your current position as an important step up the career ladder, you might fear risking that or feel unsure of whether you’re making the right decision for your career progression.

If you’ve been at your organisation for some time and have progressed through the ranks, gained trust, earned a good reputation and certain level of status, then you have most likely invested a lot of time, effort and dedication into this role! In this case, it is understandable that you are fearful of losing this investment and losing the ground you have gained in your company.

Often, we tie our identity to our titles. From the time we are children, asked what we want to be when we grow up, we have been subconsciously taught to define ourselves by our careers. It’s possible that you may fear to lose your identity if you quit your job.

Should I quit my job if it too stressful?

Should You Quit Your Job? Jacinda Ardern said she would step down from her role because she no longer had “enough in the tank” to do it. If you relate, here’s what to consider. Credit. Getty Images Published Jan.19, 2023 Updated Jan.24, 2023 Even political superstars have their job issues. Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand’s prime minister, who became known for her and her response to the of 51 people at two mosques in Christchurch, unexpectedly announced on Thursday that after nearly six years on the job.

  1. I’m leaving, because with such a privileged role comes responsibility — the responsibility to know when you are the right person to lead and also when you are not,” said Ms.
  2. Ardern, who has been facing mounting political challenges ahead of the country’s October election.
  3. I know what this job takes.

And I know that I no longer have enough in the tank to do it justice. It’s that simple.” Ms. Ardern, 42, New Zealand’s youngest prime minister in 150 years, also said she was planning to spend more time with her partner, the television presenter Clarke Gayford, and their 5-year-old daughter, Neve.

  1. Making the decision to step away from a job is not always easy or feasible.
  2. But when your physical or emotional well-being is suffering and your stress isn’t eased by the occasional, experts say it’s generally best to start looking elsewhere.
  3. Just be sure to give it some thought before,
  4. Here are some signs it might be time to leave — and what to do if you can’t.

Burnout is typically characterized by three symptoms: emotional exhaustion, negativity and the feeling that no matter how hard you try you cannot be effective at your job, said Dennis Stolle, the senior director of applied psychology at the American Psychological Association.

Everyone feels emotionally exhausted from time to time, but “I’m talking about an extreme level,” Dr. Stolle said, the type of distress where you often feel that you have nothing left to give and “if there’s one more thing, I’m just going to scream or I’m going to cry.” Burnout can also lead people to become more pessimistic or indifferent than they have been in the past.

If you’re feeling a little burned out, then taking a break — either over the weekend or during a vacation — should help, said Dr. Jessi Gold, a psychiatrist at Washington University in St. Louis. But “if you’re not feeling restored and you go right back to being angry and hating your job, that’s another warning sign” that you should think about quitting if it is financially feasible or searching for a new job, she added.

There’s a difference between ‘Ugh, work’ and ‘Oh my gosh, I cannot be there for one more day,'” Dr. Gold added. If you are feeling burned out to the degree that it is affecting your physical or emotional well-being and harming your relationships, that’s also a red flag. Take stock of how you feel when you are at work.

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Are you frequently angry, disconnected, numb or depressed? Is it like the Sunday scaries, but on steroids? If you are having a hard time sleeping or are sleeping too much, if you anger easily or if you feel sad or excessively guilty, seek help. “There is an overlapping Venn diagram between burnout and depression,” said Dr.

  • Lotte Dyrbye, the chief well-being officer at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
  • If you have even an inkling of a suspicion that you’re not well, that’s what your primary care doctor is for, to help you figure that out.” Work is often intertwined with people’s identities.
  • Our job titles, the organization we work for and even the amount of time that we spend working each day can become a big part of who we are.

But what happens when your priorities change and you no longer feel the same level of attachment to your job? “When people have a shift in an aspect of their identity, that can absolutely lead to depression and anxiety,” said Stewart Shankman, a professor of psychology at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

  1. If work used to be a core aspect of your identity and now it isn’t, then that may be a reason to consider stepping away.
  2. Even if you cannot stop working at the moment, try to take time to explore the things that do feel meaningful to you right now.
  3. There may be some other part of your life that is filling the role that work used to play, Dr.

Shankman said. “Your job doesn’t necessarily have to be the thing that defines you,” he added. that a little appreciation goes a long way for employees. Not only do employees tend to be more productive when their manager expresses gratitude, they also perform better when their teammates express appreciation, affirmation and respect.

Found that low pay, a lack of opportunities for advancement and feeling disrespected at work were the top reasons Americans had quit their jobs in 2021. People who feel valued also tend to experience psychological safety, a term that refers to how safe you feel within the workplace when contributing ideas, asking questions or sharing concerns.

In other words, the organization fosters an environment where employees feel comfortable speaking up without fear of punishment or ridicule. If you’re working for an organization that does not promote psychological safety, it may be time to consider leaving, experts say.

Nearly one in five employees described their workplace as somewhat or very toxic, according to conducted by the American Psychological Association in 2022.The organization you work for will ideally try to support its employees in various aspects of wellness, including their physical, emotional, social and financial needs.And it should also attempt to do so in an equitable way, said Laura Putnam, author of the book “Workplace Wellness That Works” and the chief executive of Motion Infusion, a company that works with organizations to promote better health and well-being for their employees.

Do some members of your workplace have more opportunities for autonomy than others? For example, is it only certain people who are allowed to take a break or who have control over how they manage their day? Are some people regularly interrupted during meetings? “If we see those kinds of dynamics at play and they’re not being called out and they’re not being addressed, then in my view that’s a good reason to leave,” Ms.

  • Putnam said.
  • The less control we have over our day-to-day activities at work, the more likely we are to be stressed.” If some of this resonates with you but you aren’t currently able to leave your job, check to see if you are eligible for short-term disability leave, provided that you can obtain a note from a health care provider.

This will give you a reprieve from your work environment while also allowing time to reflect on the specific problems that are affecting your mental well-being. If you have a qualifying condition like major depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, you have a legal right to a reasonable accommodation that would help you do your job — for example, the ability to schedule work around therapy appointments or permission to work from home.

  1. Even if you don’t have a specific condition, your employer may be open to making changes that will improve your quality of life at work.
  2. For example, you might ask to be assigned to a new team or have more flexibility in your work hours.
  3. Before approaching your manager, think about what things you would most like in a workplace and whether your current employer can provide any of them.

“Sometimes when you’re angry, you skip that reflective piece,” Dr. Gold said. “It’s helpful to look forward.” is a reporter for the Well section, covering mental health and the intersection of culture and health care. Previously, she was a parenting reporter, general assignment reporter and copy editor at The Times.

Can I get unemployment if I quit Netherlands?

Working in the Netherlands: getting fired, unemployment benefits and severance pay — Cardon & Company You came to the Netherlands to work, not to find yourself redundant. But due to the COVID-19 situation a lot of healthy employment relations are hitting the rocks for lack of business. During the first period of governmental subsidies, employers were forbidden to let employees go.

  1. Your fixed-term employment contract was not extended, so ends after the fixed term. Beware that your employer must still notify you of this non-extension. This notification is called “aanzegging” and the obligation to do so is called “aanzeggingsverplichting”.
  2. You terminate the contract, with due observance of your notice period.
  3. You mutually agree to terminate the contract, and enter into a settlement agreement.
  4. Your employer one-sidedly terminates the contract. This is very heavily regulated. These are the main conditions:(a) Termination must be approved by either Court or the Dutch Employee Agency(b) Employer must observe the legal notice period.(c) There must be an urgent reason. Examples are : misdemeanour in the performance of the work, criminal acts, economic circumstances of Employer, among others. Note: there is one major exception. If you have a contractual “proeftijd” or “probation period”, your employer may terminate your contract with immediate effect and without cause.

The aforementioned “economic circumstances” will be applied by employers looking to terminate employment contracts due to COVID-19. This will be reviewed by the Dutch Social Security Agency (UWV) and they pose some strict conditions. These are the main three: (i) the termination is necessary for the survival of the company, (ii) if there are multiple terminations, they need to be evenly spread out demographically over the employer’s workforce (“Afspiegelingsbeginsel”) and (iii) Employer must prove he did his best to either replace the employee at another position within the company or at another company.

  1. These are pretty strong prerequisites.
  2. How do I find out whether I’m working on a fixed term or indefinite contract ? Start by looking in your contract.
  3. This should specify your contract term.
  4. If your contract is fixed-term, look at your employment history.
  5. If you have been working under 3 consecutive fixed-term contracts for the same employer within 3 years, and without a pause of 6 months or more, the fourth contract automatically becomes indefinite term.

No matter what you may have agreed upon. This is called : the chain rule (“ketenregeling”) and is of cogent law. That means you cannot opt out of it, even if you want it as an employee. Note: If you have been employed as an intern at your employer, before entering into a formal employment agreement, this internship period does not count towards the chain rule explained above.

  1. I’m pregnant and my fixed-term contract is not extended.
  2. Isn’t there a rule against that? No there isn’t.
  3. Fixed-term contracts may be extended, or not extended, without cause.
  4. For this, it doesn’t matter if you’re pregnant or incapacitated.
  5. I have been fired, now what do I do? First try to determine whether your contract termination was legal.

In most cases, it is. But we’re surprised to see what kind of tricks some employers still try to get away with. Especially when they think you’re not aware of the rules. If you are being fired over “economic circumstances”, the Employer needs to prove the points we mentioned previously.

That can be pretty tough. Not sure where you’re at? Just drop us a question and we’ll see what we can do. It’s also worthwhile to check whether your employer is receiving NOW subsidies from the government. If so, he may only fire a small amount of FTE. When your termination is legal, or when you are considering a settlement agreement with your employer, the first thing you want to know about is: severance pay.

In Dutch we call it “transitievergoeding” or transition fee, The good news is: it will apply very often. The bad news is : it’s not as high as you may have hoped. The following rules apply here:

  1. Transition fees only apply when the termination was instigated by your employer. If you quit yourself, you don’t get a transition fee unless you can prove gross misdemeanor by your employer.
  2. Transition fees apply for every contract form, either fixed-term or indefinite term.
  3. Transition fees even apply when a fixed-term contract is not extended by your employer.
  4. The amount of your transition fee is roughly calculated as : ⅓ monthly salary per whole year of employment, capped at € 84,000 before taxes (2021). If you want to make exactly sure you can use the Tax Authorities calculator, It is only offered in Dutch however.
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I have a 30% ruling and I’m getting fired. How do I keep my ruling? Your ruling isn’t forfeited immediately, but you must find another employer within 3 months after your previous employment ends. It doesn’t matter when your new employment enters into effect, as long as you sign your new contract within these 3 months.

If you miss out on this, your ruling is forfeited and you need to apply for a new one from scratch. Read more about the 30% ruling, I’m unemployed, what are my benefits? When you are unemployed in the Netherlands, you may be entitled to unemployment benefits (or “WW-uitkering”). The WW- uitkering roughly amounts to 75% of your last gross monthly pay during the first 2 months of your unemployment.

How to Quit a Job: Leaving on Good Terms | Indeed

From the third month onwards, it’s 70% of your last gross monthly pay. The WW-uitkering lasts for at least 3 months, as long as you can prove you worked during 26 of the last 36 weeks before the end of your employment. Afterwards you are entitled to 1 month of WW-uitkering for every year of your employment in the Netherlands.

  1. You may not be “guilty of your own unemployment” (that’s the best translation we can give, I’m afraid). This means among others: if you quit your job yourself, or you were fired because of your behaviour, you cannot get a WW-uitkering.
  2. If you’ve entered into a settlement agreement with your employer, make sure the settlement states an “irreconcilable difference of opinion about the performance of your job” or similar words. If you state you’re fed up with the situation, you may miss out on your WW-uitkering.
  3. Your employment contract must contain a termination clause. Fixed-term contracts don’t always have such a clause, so check this.
  4. Be sure to let your employer continue to pay for the duration of your notice period, even if this notice period was not applied. This is called the “fictitious notice period”. You will never get WW during this period, even if you don’t receive pay during this period.
  5. The WW-uitkering does not apply to freelancers who have worked from an eenmanszaak (ZZP-ers). If you’ve worked as a freelancer from a BV, you have pay rolled yourself and paid your social security taxes, which means you are eligible for WW-uitkering.

The Netherlands has a lot of rules for the protection of employees. If you feel you have been treated wrongfully or just feel daunted by all the regulations, you can always reach out to us.

  • Written : December 2020.
  • Do you have any questions after reading this?
  • Don’t hesitate to reach out,

: Working in the Netherlands: getting fired, unemployment benefits and severance pay — Cardon & Company

Should I resign by email?

What Is a Resignation Email, and How Do You Write One? | Placement Learn The way that you resign can have lasting implications. If you burn bridges with your current employer, it can affect your future job search and potential job offers. So, do all that you can to cushion the blow and leave on a positive note.

Resigning requires writing a formal resignation letter and, ideally, delivering it in person. The letter can also be sent as an attachment to an email. This article explains what a resignation email is and what it is not. We explain how to write the email and the formal letter of resignation so that the likelihood of your news being well-received is high.

We provide a resignation letter example and a resignation email template and discuss the next steps.

What are the rules to quitting?

Give at least two weeks’ notice Two weeks’ notice is the standard length of time to give an employer before you leave. However, if you’ve signed an employment contract, make sure you’re honoring any rules around the length of notice.

Is it selfish to quit your job?

Is it Selfish to Quit? Nearly every week it seems, I hear from someone in this community asking some form of this question: Is it selfish to quit my job? They use different words each time, of course, but it always comes down to this core idea. On the one hand, this tells me that the people who connect with my work are nice.

  • They worry about putting their colleagues in a difficult situation.
  • They don’t want to focus so deeply on their own career goals that they harm others in the process.
  • I get that.
  • But on the other hand, there’s a point at which,
  • And this is that point.
  • Let me be clear: No, it is NOT selfish to quit your job for any reason.

You are a free agent. You get to make the decisions that make the most sense for your career and your life, regardless of how that impacts others. It is nice to worry about your colleagues, and there are lots of things you can do to support them through the transition.

You can (and should) do your best to give them adequate notice and provide them with the information they need to fill in the gaps once you’re gone. You’re a professional and, with the right approach, you can leave with your relationships and reputation intact. This kind of thing happens ALL THE TIME in the workplace.

We have all experienced times when a colleague has quit, and we’ve had to pick up the pieces. Sometimes it’s harder than others. But (most of the time) we don’t resent them for their decision! We understand the unspoken agreement of the workplace: We’re all here for as long as it makes sense.

You should NEVER pass on career opportunities simply because you’re worried about your colleagues and don’t want to cause them pain.Brace yourself because I’m going to say something tough: You are not that important. No one is.

Anyone who quits a job can and will be replaced. The team will not collapse, and the company will not fold because of you (and if they do, there were bigger problems to begin with.) It might be hard to fill your shoes, but it will be done. You might be missed, but your name will not be cursed for decades.

(And again, if it is, there were bigger problems!) It’s normal to feel guilty when your actions impact others in a way that might make them uncomfortable. It shows you have empathy. But don’t use that as an excuse not to follow your career aspirations. We can’t live our lives for others. If we do, we just end up resenting them.

Instead, channel that empathy into action. When the time is right for you to move on, do everything in your power to minimize disruption for the team: document your procedures, organize information, and train others. Be a good colleague and set them up for success in your absence.

  1. As you walk out the door, hold your head up high knowing you’ve done the right thing, both for yourself and for your team.
  2. If you’ve been struggling to leave a job out of guilt, ask yourself: Is that the REAL reason? Or is it perhaps fear? Or maybe you just don’t want to leave! Listen to your inner voice and assess what you’re feeling rationally.

Then, make your decisions. Live YOUR life. To quote the genius Dr. Seuss: “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.” The Career Success Library is a convenient, affordable online learning center for career advancers including administrative professionals, emerging leaders, and anyone else who wants to leverage the power of ongoing professional development.

Should I quit or get fired?

Typically, employees who resign and end on good terms with an employer have a greater chance of receiving a positive reference from that former employer. On the other hand, when an individual has been terminated, their former employer might provide less than satisfactory remarks due to the circumstances.

Why am I starting to hate my job?

What to do if I hate my job – Let’s first walk through some reasons why you might hate your job. After all, it’s important to reflect and identify what components of your job you dislike. A bad manager can have a profound impact on your overall employee experience.

In fact, according to Gallup, a bad manager can account for 70% of the variance, both negative and positive, in employee engagement. Connections also play a massive role in the employee experience. According to our new research, 53% of employees don’t look forward to coming to work because of colleagues.

Beyond that, 43% of employees don’t feel connected to their colleagues. And 38% of employees don’t trust their co-workers. When we look at how connections impact your emotional well-being and mental fitness, it’s significant. Our data (cited above) shows that those with low social connections suffer.

Employees in this bucket experience increased stress, anxiety, depression, and burnout. And without that connection, a crisis can brew, It leads to workers that have a 313% stronger intention to quit — and a 176% increased likelihood of serious job seeking. You might have found yourself in a job you hate.

And for some, that might be looking for a new job. But before you jump into the job search and start churning out applications, take a minute to walk through these 9 steps.

Why do employees quiet quit?

What is Quiet Quitting? – The Great Resignation ignited employees to think about their careers, salaries, and overall treatment at work. Lack of advancement opportunities, low pay, and feeling disrespected were the top reasons for many to quit their jobs.

  • Those that did not physically quit their jobs chose to “quiet” quit.
  • Quiet quitting is a softer approach than outright leaving a job.
  • The term isn’t literal but a play on words.
  • Rather than workers quitting jobs, they are quitting the idea of going above and beyond.
  • Unhappy with some aspect of their current company or role, they choose only to complete the bare minimum.
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While the quiet quitting trend has gotten a bad reputation, that may be unfair. It’s ultimately all a matter of perspective. Some quiet quitters claim they are simply setting boundaries where they belong and refusing to take on what they can’t handle.

When employees go silent?

Incidence – Employee silence, the antithesis of employee voice, refers to situations where employees suppress information that might be useful to the organization of which they are a part. One way this can happen is if employees do not speak up to a supervisor or manager.

  1. Van Dyne et al.
  2. 2003) define silence as an employee’s motivation to withhold or express ideas, information and opinions about work‐related improvements.
  3. This silence can be intentional or unintentional; information can be consciously held back by employees.
  4. Or it can be an unintentional failure to communicate or a merely a matter of having nothing to say (Tangirala and Ramanujam, 2008).

In an organization, this is interesting because it appears that silence is a communicative choice that employees may decide to adopt. Indeed, when there is a problem in the workplace, employees have two options: remain silent or speak up. Unfortunately, many employees choose to remain silent because they do not want to share information that could be interpreted as negative or threatening.

Employees typically remain silent about conflicts with co-workers, disagreements about organizational decisions, potential weaknesses in work processes, illegal or dangerous behaviors, and individual/personal grievances. Their silence keeps management from receiving critical information that would allow their organizations to improve or address problems before they have adverse effects.

The question of why employees choose to communicate or not in an organizational setting is an interesting one. As Milliken et al. (2003) state, “there is evidence from a variety of sources that employees often do not feel comfortable speaking to their bosses about organizational problems or issues that concern them.” Employees might be afraid of the outcome of speaking up, they might feel like nothing will change, they might simply feel intimidated with the subject matter that they wish to express, or they might feel intimidated by whom they would have to talk to.

  • Also, if their co-workers aren’t speaking up, they might be inclined to close their mouths as well, termed “collective silence”.
  • They might not want to break away from the crowd and present an opinion that differs from the majority.
  • Or, employees might not feel like they possess enough power to speak up and voice their opinions; this notion is of particular significance when the organization is structured and set up as a hierarchy or bureaucracy.

Employee silence can occur in any organization, most often in organizations where communication is suffering. Employee silence causes the most damage when employees and supervisors do not meet on a regular basis. In a virtual workplace this is also true.

  • In a virtual workplace the only in-person communication is in small discussion groups.
  • This kind of organization is very susceptible to employee silence because there is almost no person-to-person communication, and it is very easy to ignore or misinterpret things like email.
  • Employee silence is a problem for more than just virtual organizations.

Within the past few years employee silence has been happening more often in non-virtual organizations. Organizations where considerable risk is involved such as airports and “hospitals; should be especially mindful of” employee silence. This is because mistakes caused by employee silence in these organizations can lead to the loss of life or serious damage costs to the organization.

How soon is it acceptable to quit a job?

How long should you stay at a job? – In an ideal world, you should stay at each job for a minimum of two years. However, if you quickly come to realize you made the wrong choice when accepting a position, don’t feel obligated to stay at the company until your two-year anniversary.

Is it selfish to quit your job?

Is it Selfish to Quit? Nearly every week it seems, I hear from someone in this community asking some form of this question: Is it selfish to quit my job? They use different words each time, of course, but it always comes down to this core idea. On the one hand, this tells me that the people who connect with my work are nice.

  • They worry about putting their colleagues in a difficult situation.
  • They don’t want to focus so deeply on their own career goals that they harm others in the process.
  • I get that.
  • But on the other hand, there’s a point at which,
  • And this is that point.
  • Let me be clear: No, it is NOT selfish to quit your job for any reason.

You are a free agent. You get to make the decisions that make the most sense for your career and your life, regardless of how that impacts others. It is nice to worry about your colleagues, and there are lots of things you can do to support them through the transition.

You can (and should) do your best to give them adequate notice and provide them with the information they need to fill in the gaps once you’re gone. You’re a professional and, with the right approach, you can leave with your relationships and reputation intact. This kind of thing happens ALL THE TIME in the workplace.

We have all experienced times when a colleague has quit, and we’ve had to pick up the pieces. Sometimes it’s harder than others. But (most of the time) we don’t resent them for their decision! We understand the unspoken agreement of the workplace: We’re all here for as long as it makes sense.

You should NEVER pass on career opportunities simply because you’re worried about your colleagues and don’t want to cause them pain.Brace yourself because I’m going to say something tough: You are not that important. No one is.

Anyone who quits a job can and will be replaced. The team will not collapse, and the company will not fold because of you (and if they do, there were bigger problems to begin with.) It might be hard to fill your shoes, but it will be done. You might be missed, but your name will not be cursed for decades.

  1. And again, if it is, there were bigger problems!) It’s normal to feel guilty when your actions impact others in a way that might make them uncomfortable.
  2. It shows you have empathy.
  3. But don’t use that as an excuse not to follow your career aspirations.
  4. We can’t live our lives for others.
  5. If we do, we just end up resenting them.

Instead, channel that empathy into action. When the time is right for you to move on, do everything in your power to minimize disruption for the team: document your procedures, organize information, and train others. Be a good colleague and set them up for success in your absence.

  • As you walk out the door, hold your head up high knowing you’ve done the right thing, both for yourself and for your team.
  • If you’ve been struggling to leave a job out of guilt, ask yourself: Is that the REAL reason? Or is it perhaps fear? Or maybe you just don’t want to leave! Listen to your inner voice and assess what you’re feeling rationally.

Then, make your decisions. Live YOUR life. To quote the genius Dr. Seuss: “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.” The Career Success Library is a convenient, affordable online learning center for career advancers including administrative professionals, emerging leaders, and anyone else who wants to leverage the power of ongoing professional development.

Is burnout a good reason to quit?

5. You’re Burnt Out – Is burnout and stress on your list of good reasons to quit a job? If your job has lost its luster and you feel like the long hours, pressure and anxiety aren’t worth it anymore; you’re not alone. Every day, people quit their jobs due to the emotional exhaustion and chronic stress of demanding roles.

Try working more efficiently by prioritizing your responsibilities and projects. Also, do your best to minimize distractions to concentrate on the more essential tasks. Ask for help when you need it. If your duties seem overwhelming or excessive, write them down and discuss them with your supervisor. This way, you may be able to delegate tasks or request assistance. Take time for self-care and rest. Taking care of your mental health and engaging in activities that allow you to regain balance can offset the feeling of burnout. Try a new hobby, meditation, or sit down and read a book. Find out what, if any, services and resources your company offers to help you with your mental health at work. Maybe your benefits include therapy sessions or occupational health assessments.

Again, we urge you to take your mental health seriously and never stay in a work environment that you feel you are unable to cope with any longer. If you are experiencing signs of burnout, please talk to a trusted professional such as your medical provider or a therapist.