How To Plait Hair

22.08.2023 0 Comments

How To Plait Hair

How do you plait your hair perfectly?

Accent Fishtail Braid – Once you’ve got the steps down pat, fishtail braids are super easy to achieve. To create an accent fishtail braid, begin by gathering a 2-inch section of hair on either side of your head. Divide the section into two even segments.

Is a plait a damaging hair style?

Updated: 7 Jan 2020, 11:07 am IST

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Once upon a time, mommy didn’t let you out of sight without tying your hair in neat, stylish braids. We say, the time to do so has come again now. Not just because it looks fashionable, but also because braiding can be a blessing in disguise for your hair health.

  1. Don’t believe us? Well, take a look at the reasons explained by Dr Apoorva Shah, trichologist and founder of RichFeel Hair Clinic, Mumbai and you will definitely get convinced to braid up your precious mane.1.
  2. It can avoid hair breakage “Braiding the hair is a good, protective practice that can save your hair from any breakage as it strengthens the hair structurally.

In fact, a loosely-tied braid can work alongside your body’s natural process to boost hair growth,” Shah explains. Braids can be your best friend in saving those precious manes. Image courtesy: Shutterstock 2. It takes care of your hair even while you’re asleep As per Shah, braiding your hair before going to bed can have great results because of the lesser friction produced between the tied hair and the pillow cover,3.

It can keep your hair nourished “Braiding helps to lock the moisture into the hair, keeping them moisturised and nourished,” Shah points out. “You can even oil the hair with Brahmi Jaborandi hair oil before braiding the hair for deeper nourishment,” he adds. Track your health on the go ! Download Healthshots App 4.

It can prevent frizziness You know how frizzy, out-of-whack hair are just about enough to spoil your look and well, your mood right? Well, braiding can spare you the horror. According to Shah, the added nourishment and moisture-locking ability of braiding is something that can even keep hair frizziness and dryness at bay.

  1. Also read: 4 easy-peasy hair hacks that will help you tame that frizz 5.
  2. It can keep split-ends away Braiding your hair before stepping out can protect it against damage from the sun and well—pollution.
  3. With lesser exposure to these stress-causing elements, you hair tends to stay protected against the resulting split-ends and dryness,” Shah says.

Say bye-bye to those ugly split ends! Image courtesy: Shutterstock But keep this in mind While braiding can be a great protective measure for your hair, Shah recommends not keeping your hair tied into them for more than 7-8 hours a day. Additionally, he warns against tying the hair into tight braids as doing so can put strain on the hair follicle and lead to hair loss.

Though braiding is good for the hair, avoid any tight braiding styles as it strains the hair roots. Making tiny braids can lead to itching of hair and will cause damage to the hair shaft. The best way is to keep changing the hairstyles. Hence, it is important to tie the braids comfortably and ensure that there is no specific strain on the hair roots.

Along with braiding it’s also important to nourish the hair and follow a hair care regimen regularly under the guidance of a trichologist to promote hair growth. Call your mommy to get that hair braiding technique right! GIF courtesy: GIPHY Also read: 10 women talk to us about the one hair care hack that they swear by

What culture wore braids first?

The Origin of Braids – Getty Images Sims traces the origins of braids back to African culture. “Braids have been impressionable throughout history,” says Sims. “The origin of braids can be traced back 5000 years in African culture to 3500 BC—they were very popular among women.” Braids are not just a style; this craft is a form of art.

  1. Braiding started in Africa with the Himba people of Namibia,” says Pace.
  2. These people have been braiding their hair for centuries.
  3. In many African tribes, braided hairstyles were a unique way to identify each tribe.
  4. Braid patterns and hairstyles were an indication of a person’s tribe, age, marital status, wealth, power, and religion.

Braiding was and is a social art. Because of the amount of time it can take, people often would take the time to socialize. It began with the elders braiding their children, then the children would watch and learn from them. Younger children would start practicing on each other and eventually learn the traditional styles.

This tradition of bonding was carried on for generations and quickly made its way across the world. It was around the 1900s when braids became most popular around the world. Almost all women, children, and most men in some way had their hair braided.” In relation to time periods, Pace credits Africa with cornrows in 3500 BC; Egypt with afro box braids in 3100 BC; Greece with the halo braid in the first century; Native Americans with pigtail braids in the fifth century; Europe with the crown braid from 1066 to 1485; China with the staircase braid from 1644 to 1912; the Caribbean with modern cornrows in the 1970s; and the Internet (of course) with braid tutorials becoming especially popular in 2005 when YouTube launched.

According to Sims, cornrows with beads were very popular in the 1970s, and box braids gained popularity in the 1990s. “In my opinion, braids will never be out of the picture. They’re always going to be fashionable because they’re practical and chic,” says Saviano.

What is the French braid?

French braid – Wikipedia Type of braid A French braid, also called a French plait, is a type of, The three-strand gathered plait includes three sections of hair that are braided together from the crown of the head to the nape of the neck.

What do Americans call braids?

/pleɪt/ (US usually braid) Add to word list Add to word list. to join three or more pieces of hair or string-like material by putting them over each other in a special pattern : She plaited the horse’s tail.

Is it hard to plait your own hair?

How to Braid Hair: The Ultimate Guide for Beginners From the runway to your weekend coffee run, braided hairstyles always look on point! Braiding your hair keeps it out of your face, protects your strands from damage, and allows you to create an endless variety of fast heat-free styles for both formal and everyday occasions.

How do you start braiding hair? How long does your hair have to be to braid? How do you do a simple braid? How to braid your own hair to the scalp How to braid hair for beginners How to French braid your own hair How to Dutch braid your own hair How to braid short hair How to box braid your own hair How to braid hair for men

If you’re looking to start braiding your own hair, you might be wondering how to make your braids look neat and stylish. The key to awesome braids is prepping your hair properly. Taking a few extra moments to comb through your strands, apply product, and create clean sections will pay off with a more aesthetic hairstyle that holds for longer. The length required to braid hair depends on your hair type and desired style. At a minimum, your hair must be long enough that it can be parted, combed to the side and gripped securely between your finger and thumb. If you have short to mid-length hair, you may be wondering if your hair is long enough to braid.

Good news- the answer is probably YES! With 2-3 inches of hair you can create small cornrows or micro braids close to the scalp. If you have 3-5 inches of hair (equivalent to a long pixie cut or “medium length” mens haircut), you can achieve a wider variety of styles, from waterfall braided bangs to side braids and even small French braids.

Longer hair is best for milkmaid braids, braided buns, crown braids and chunky, dramatic braids. However, if you don’t have long, thick hair you can still create these fun styles- just clip in your favorite hair extensions before you start braiding! A simple three-strand braid is one of the easiest styles to master. But basic doesn’t have to be boring! A few stylist-approved tricks can elevate this quick-and-easy braid to a beautiful classic look. Here’s how to create a perfect three-strand braid: Step #1: Comb and prep.

Make sure you start with dry, combed-out hair. This is a great EASY style to wear in-between shampoos! For a volume boost, work a palmful of into your hair before styling. Step #2: Apply styling paste. Put a dab of in your hand, rub your palms together to emulsify the product, and smooth it through your hair from mid-shafts (ear level) to ends.

Step #3: Section your hair. You can either create a center braid that falls down the middle of your back, or bring your hair over one shoulder for a side braid. Divide your hair into three equal sections and secure each one with a clear elastic to keep the sections neat.

Step #4: Pick up one of your side sections and cross it OVER the middle section. (For a side braid, start with the section nearest your face.) This now becomes the new middle piece. Gently pull the braid tight. Step #5: Pick up the section from the opposite side and cross it OVER the middle section. Again, this piece is now your new middle section.

Gently pull the braid tight. Step#6: Repeat Steps Four and Five until you reach the ends of your hair. Maintain light tension by firmly gripping each section as you work. Step #7: Secure the ends with a clear elastic. Gently pull the braid apart for more volume (if desired), tidy up any flyaways, mist your braid with and you’re good to go! Cornrows, also known as scalp braids, are a great way to give natural or relaxed hair a rest from chemical treatments while protecting your delicate strands.

  • These beautiful braids can be as simple or as intricate as you want to make them.
  • For braid beginners, it’s a good idea to start with basic front-to-back cornrows.Follow these steps to braid your own hair to the scalp: Step #1: Prep your hair.
  • Wash, deep-condition and detangle your hair with a wide tooth comb.

Apply to your damp hair and blow dry, or allow it to air-dry. Next, apply a small amount of to your palms and work it into your hair from tips to roots. This will give your braids better grip while reducing frizz. Step #2: Section the hair. You can create any size of braids that you prefer- just be sure to keep your sections consistent.

Use the tail of your comb to separate a section of hair from your face to the back of your head. Starting on either the left or right side (by sectioning the hair just above your ear) is generally easier than starting in the center. Secure the rest of your hair with clips to keep your sections neat. Step #3: Prepare to braid.

Part off a small piece of hair at the front of your section, next to your hairline. Divide this hair into three equal pieces. Hold the left and center pieces in your left hand, and grip the right piece in your right hand. Maintain a firm grip, but avoid pulling on the hair, which could result in painfully tight cornrows.

  1. Step #4: Start with a three-strand braid.
  2. Bring the left section UNDER the center section, then bring the right section UNDER the new center section.
  3. Step #5: Add hair to your cornrow.
  4. As you continue this underhand braid, begin adding small pieces of hair from each side before bringing the hair under the center section.

Use your index finger as a “hook” to reach under the center section, pick up more hair and add it to the side section. Then bring the side section UNDER the center section. Pick up the same amount of hair each time for a balanced shape. Step #6: Detangle as you go.

If you find your hair gets tangled while you braid, use your fingers to gently comb through any knots. Step #7: Finish the braid. Once all the hair from the section has been braided to your scalp, finish your cornrow with a three-strand braid (if your hair is long). If needed, secure the ends of the braid with a small hair elastic.

Step #8: Repeat with the rest of your hair. Follow Steps Two-Seven until all of your hair has been braided to the scalp. For classic cornrows, create straight parts and uniform sections so that the braids look even. Once you master the basic cornrow technique, there are endless styling possibilities to try out! “I love your hair- did you do that yourself?” Even if you’ve never done any style more complicated than a ponytail, it’s easy to start braiding hair as a beginner. The truth is that most braids are actually very simple patterns (even if they look super-complicated!).

  • For a beginner, the hardest part is often learning how to grip the hair and create a braid that looks balanced from top to bottom.If you’re new to braiding, the best place to start is with the basic three-strand braid.
  • This simple technique forms the foundation for all other braids and braided hairstyles.
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Try these tips to master the skill of braiding: Practice, practice, practice! It helps to practice braiding in front of a mirror with all your hair swept over one shoulder to the front. If you’re right-handed, start by braiding your hair over your right shoulder; if you’re a lefty, braid your hair over your left shoulder.

  • You can also practice braiding shoelaces, fabric strips, or even licorice ropes! Never skip prepping your hair.
  • It’s important to start with dry or slightly-damp hair (wet hair stretches too easily and is prone to breakage).
  • Always comb through any tangles and apply a lightweight for easier braiding.
  • Create neat, even sections.

Divide your hair into three equal sections: left, middle and right. Comb through the sections and secure each one with a small clear elastic to keep them separated. Find your rhythm. Starting with the side section closest to your face, cross it over the middle section.

  • Then take the section on the opposite side and cross it over the new middle strand.
  • Repeat this simple pattern- right over center, left over center, right over center, left over center- until you reach the ends of your hair.
  • Don’t drop your hair! Do your braids tend to come out too loose? Be sure to maintain a firm grip on each section, especially the center section, while you braid your hair.

As you bring a side piece into the center, use the thumb and pointer finger of the opposite hand to grab it in a pincer grip with your fingers close to the braid. Maintain light, consistent tension and gently cinch the braid after every stitch to keep it from sliding out of shape.

  1. Add a finishing touch.
  2. After braiding your hair, secure the ends with a clear elastic.
  3. For a fuller braid, “pancake” your hair by gently pulling out small pieces.
  4. Use your fingers to adjust the shape until it’s just right, then finish with a to keep your braid in place.
  5. Now that you’ve mastered the basic three-strand braid, what’s next? Get creative with your classic braids by styling your hair in two plaits, or braid one small section of your hair and leave the rest loose for a fun casual look.Another great versatile braid for beginners to learn is the French braid.

It looks way harder than it is, and keeps your hair in place even on windy days! Read on to discover exactly how to French braid your own hair. French braids look so pretty but they can be a little challenging to do on your own hair! Unlike a basic three-strand braid, you’ll be adding hair from the sides as you braid.The secret is to braid tightly and add small, consistent sections of hair. To avoid looking like a Pinterest failure, follow these simple steps to correctly French braid your own hair: Step #1: Prepare your hair.

  1. Make sure to start with dry, well-combed hair.
  2. Both freshly-washed and second-day hair will work for a French braid, but slightly dirty hair gives you better hold.
  3. Apply a dab of to your hands, emulsify the product, and work it through your hair for added grip.
  4. Step #2: Brush and section your hair.
  5. Tip your head slightly back and brush your hair straight back from your face.

Separate the hair on top of your head, from the temple areas to the crown, as if you were pulling back your hair for a half-up style. Divide this hair into three equal pieces. Step #3: Begin with a three-strand braid. Cross the right section over the center section, then cross the left section over the new center section.

This helps to strengthen the braid before you start adding hair. Step #4: Add hair from the right. Grip each of the three sections in your left hand and use your right hand to pick up a small piece of hair, creating a horizontal line from your right temple all the way to the side of the braid. Step #5: Incorporate this new hair into the right section, using your fingers to comb the hair together.

Then cross the right section over the center section to continue braiding. Step #6: Add hair from the left. Grip each of the three sections in your right hand and use your left hand to pick up a small piece of hair, this time from the left side of your head.

Be sure to create a clean line from your left temple all the way to the side of the braid. Step #7: Incorporate this new hair into the left section, combine the hair together, and cross the left section over the right section. Step #8: Repeat Steps Four-Seven until you reach the nape of the neck. Remember to add small, evenly sized sections of hair as you work down your head.

(Think about creating a pattern of horizontal stripes!) TIP: To avoid an unsightly bulge in your French braid, keep your hands close to your head and neck. As you incorporate the final sections of hair, avoid adding large pieces or lifting hair up to add it to the braid,

  • Instead, continue working with small sections and moving the newly added hair straight across.
  • Step #9: Braid the tail.
  • Once all your hair has been incorporated into the braid, finish by braiding the rest of your hair in a three-strand braid.
  • If needed, you can bring your hair over your shoulder at this point for easier access.

Step #10: Finish your French braid. Secure the braid with a clear elastic. If desired, pull apart small pieces from the center of the braid for a fuller look. (Do not pull on the sides, as this could cause hair to slip out of your braid.) Spray all over and use your hands to gently pat down any flyaways.

  • Mastering the art of French braiding takes a bit of time and practice, but this skill opens the doors to SO many amazing hairstyles! Try creating two French braids and securing them at the nape of your neck, leaving your ends loose and wavy.
  • Or do a small face-framing French braid! We also love pinning up the ends of two French braids for a super-quick halo braid.

Wanna go Dutch? While Dutch braids look complicated, they’re actually just French braids in reverse! Instead of crossing the hair over the center section, you bring the hair underneath, For this reason, Dutch braids are sometimes referred to as inside-out or reverse French braids.

Dutch braids have a cool boxy shape and can be used to create countless trendy hairstyles. This is a good style to learn after you’ve mastered the basic three-strand braid and the French braid. Just follow these simple steps to Dutch braid your own hair: Step #1: Get ready. Start with dry, well-combed hair.

Craving longer or thicker braids? Clip in your favorite hair extensions. Step #2: Part and section your hair. For two Dutch braids, use a tail comb to create a center part in your hair. Divide your hair into two sides, and clip one side out of the way. Step #3: Apply a dab of to your hands, emulsify the product, and work it through your strands for easier styling and less slippage.

Step #4: Create a small triangle-shaped section of hair at the front of your hairline. The center part will form one side of this triangle, and your hairline will form the second side. Use your fingers or a rat tail comb to create the third side of the triangle, and separate this section of hair. Step #5: Split the triangle-shaped section into three equal pieces.

Step #6: Begin braiding. Pick up the piece of hair closest to your face and bring it UNDER the center section. This piece now becomes the new center section. Then pick up the piece farthest from your face and bring it UNDER the center section. Step #7: Add hair to your braid.

  1. As you continue braiding, add a small piece of hair to each section before bringing it under the center section.
  2. For a neat and balanced braid, make sure to add the same amount of hair each time and keep your sections clean.
  3. Step #8: Place your hands where you want your braid to go.
  4. As you continue braiding, direct the hair over and behind your ear.

Think about forming a diagonal line from your hairline towards the back of your head. Step #9: Finish with a three-strand braid. Once you have incorporated all the hair from that section, braid the rest of your hair in a classic three-strand braid. Continue bringing the side pieces UNDER the center piece for a consistent look. If you’re wondering, “Is my hair too short to braid?” you might be pleasantly surprised. While certain braided hairstyles work best with long flowing locks, there are many styles you can create with short hair.Some of the best braided hairstyles for short hair are those that involve adding hair to the braid, such as cornrows, French braids and Dutch braids.

When can I plait my hair?

So, How Long Does hair Have to Be to Braid? – NeonShot/Shutterstock Lots of people wonder, “How long does hair have to be to braid?” To recap: You need hair that is at least 2 inches (minimum) long, but it’s best to have hair 4-5 inches. Know that braiding short hair is a little more challenging than longer hair.

  1. But any hair type – coily, curly, wavy, and straight – will look great in braids.
  2. All you have to do is master the technique of keeping hold of your hair sections as you work through it.
  3. If you’re sick of wearing the same hairstyle every day with short hair, braids could be the solution for you.
  4. Your hair doesn’t have to be very long to braid, but if your patience (and hair) is short, give yourself time to perfect the process or find a stylist who can make it happen.

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Are French plaits easy?

Download Article Download Article The French braid is a beautiful and classic hairstyle and a favorite to many. Although its intricate weave may appear complicated, creating your own French braid is a simple process. The secret is to add a strand of hair to each section before braiding it. Once you’ve gotten the basics of a traditional braid down, you could try a French lace braid for a fancy twist.

  1. 1 Prep your hair so it is ready for styling. Brush through your hair to get all the tangles out and make it soft, smooth, and ready to braid. For a single braid going down the back of your head, brush your hair backwards, away from your forehead.
    • You might want a braid down the side of your head instead, or maybe you’re making more than one braid. In that case, part your hair and brush it into sections depending on how many braids you would like.
    • You can braid your hair when it’s dry or when it’s wet. But, braiding wet hair gives you soft, pretty waves when you take it out later.
  2. 2 Begin sectioning your hair, Start the process by gathering a big chunk (3-4 inches wide) from the top-center of your head. All the hair in this section should come from the same “hair row.” You don’t want to grab strands from higher up or lower down.
    • If you have bangs, you can bring them into the braid at this point or leave them loose. Choose what you think looks best. To braid them, you’ll need to grab hair from the very top-center of your head, right above your forehead.
    • The section you start with has nothing to do with how big your braid will be. You start with a small section, but the braid grows thicker as you add more hair.

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  3. 3 Separate this first “chunk” into three pieces. Just like traditional braids, French braids use three sections of hair to create their pattern. Separate them out by running your fingers through the chunk you are holding to create three even pieces. Make sure that none of the pieces are larger or smaller than the other two.
  4. 4 Begin in a traditional braid, First, you have to get your hand positioning right: hold two strands in one hand, and the third strand in the other. Begin in a traditional braid by crossing the “right” strand over to the center. Then, cross the “left” strand from over to the center. Repeat until you’ve made a few rows of a traditional braid.
  5. 5 Work in new hair. Keep going with this traditional braid pattern, but start bringing in other pieces of hair. Before crossing a section over to center, grab some hair from that side of your head and include it in the cross-over.
    • Every time you cross over, work in another small piece of hair. How much new hair you grab each time doesn’t matter, but the less hair you grab, the more intricate the braid will look.
    • For the best-looking French braid, pick up the hair near your face and neck. If you only pick up pieces from the center (near the main strand), they’ll get covered up later with strands from the outside.
  6. 6 Bring all of your hair into the braid. As you work down your head, you’ll start running out of free hair to bring into the braid. By the time you reach the nape of your neck, you should have incorporated all of your hair.
  7. 7 Finish the braid. When all of your hair is in the working braid, finish it off as a traditional braid. Keep going until you reach the end of your strands. Then, secure the braid with a ponytail holder.
    • Avoid using rubber bands, as these rip and break hair when you remove them.
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  1. 1 Prep your hair. Just like you did for the normal French braid, brush through tangles to smooth out your hair. French lace braids can work down either one or both sides of your head, so need to part your hair. Use a center or side part, depending on what look you prefer.
  2. 2 Start with a small section. Grab a piece of your hair from one side your part, near the part itself. The size of this section does matter in French lace, as it determines the thickness of the braid. For a larger braid, grab a hefty section of hair, and for a dainty braid, grab a smaller piece. In general, it should be about one inch thick.
  3. 3 Split this section into thirds. As with the normal French braid, you need to divide your starting section of hair into three even pieces. Angle these pieces downward to frame your face, rather than pulling them toward the back of your head.
  4. 4 Begin braiding, Start the French lace in a traditional braid. Cross the “right” strand over to center, then cross the “left” strand over to center.
  5. 5 Start bringing in new hair. In the French braid, you added hair from both sides of your head. In the French lace braid, you should only add hair from one side of the braid.
    • It doesn’t matter which side you add new hair from. The important thing is that all new hair comes from the same side of the braid.
  6. 6 Continue braiding around your head. As you move further along with your braid, it will start to form a crown or halo shape around your head. You can choose to braid over the top of your ear, or under it.
    • If you are making a single braid, wrap it all the way around your head. You will likely run out of hair near the ear on the other side of your head.
    • If you’re making two braids, stop braiding when you reach the nape of your neck. Tie off the first braid with an elastic, then repeat the entire process on the other side of your head to create your second braid.
  7. 7 Finish your braid. Eventually, you will run out of loose hair to work into the braid. At this point, keep working in a traditional braid until you reach the ends of your strands. Tie off your hair with an elastic tie to secure your French lace braid.
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Add New Question

  • Question Is a French braid formal enough for a wedding? Yes. A French braid is formal enough for any wedding theme.
  • Question Is it easy to take out? Yes, if you do it correctly. Take the band out and gently pull on the outer edges to loosen it. Continue this until you have taken it out. Whatever you do, do NOT brush or comb it as soon as you take the band out. It will just make the biggest tangle ever.
  • Question Can I learn to French braid my own hair if I can French braid my friend’s hair? Yes, you can learn. It will take a little practice getting used to doing it on your own hair, but since you already know how to do it on a friend’s, you have a nice head start!

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  • Braid your hair in the mirror, so that you can see what you’re doing.
  • It is easier to braid if your hair is wet.
  • This hairstyle is great for activities like dancing or cheerleading. You need to remember to start the braid high on your head and secure it with bobby pins as you go.

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  • Be careful not to let go of your hair while French-braiding it, or it might undo and you may have to start over.
  • Your arms may get tired while braiding your hair. Bend forward to release tension or rest your arms on a surface behind you (ex. a headboard or backrest).You could also temporarily tie it with elastic and give your arms a rest.

Advertisement Article Summary X Before beginning your French braid, brush your hair to remove any tangles or knots. Then, grab a 3-inch section of hair at the crown of your head and divide it into three equal pieces. Start your French braid with one row of a traditional braid, which you can do by first crossing the right strand into the center, then crossing the left strand into the center.

As you prepare to repeat your braid, grab a small section of new hair from the area of hair you wish to include in your braid, and incorporate it into the next cross. Be sure to gently comb through any bumps to keep a sleek look. Continue braiding so that every time you do a new cross, you’re gathering slightly more hair.

Repeat until your braid is finished. Finally, secure the braid and enjoy! For tips from our Beauty reviewer on how to make an alternate French lace braid, keep reading! Did this summary help you? Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 7,753,625 times.

Is it OK to sleep in a plait?

9 Truths To Know Before Sleeping In Braids To Ensure You Don’t Damage Your Hair Although braiding your hair at night might be an easy fix for wavy hair the next day, there are a lot of truths to know before sleeping in braids. While the idea of waking up to beautiful, bouncy curls may seem effortless, there’s actually a lot of thought and preparation that needs to go into it the night before.

  • I’ve been sleeping in since I was in high school and over the years, I discovered that it was the best way for me to curl my hair in a timely and efficient fashion.
  • It’s quick and easy, and it turns out pretty well! But since I have thin hair, I always made sure that I braided my hair the right way so I could avoid any further damage to my strands.

When using this practice, I’ve had to be extremely cautious in making sure my braids don’t tire or stress my hair out. Ponytails and hair braidings can cause hair to break, especially if your style is pulled tightly. If you wear it that way every day, permanent hair damage can occur.

  • If you can avoid sleeping in braids every single night, do it.
  • But if it’s just too much of a timesaver for you to pass up, make sure you take the right precautions the night before.
  • According to Lovelyish, that means keeping your braid loose and making sure your hair is dry — not wet — before your plait.

Here are a handful of other things to keep in mind before you sleep in braids: This has helped my hair tremendously when it comes to, Since my hair is really long and thin, I make sure to apply a leave-in conditioner before I go to bed. Applying the conditioner can keep your strands hydrated, smooth, and silky.

  1. If you don’t want to apply leave-in conditioner, I highly recommend using an anti-frizz spray.
  2. Not only will this keep your hair from being frizzy when you let your hair braids loose, but it’ll also give your hair the proper moisture it needs all night long.
  3. Sleeping on a silk pillowcase can do wonders for your beauty routine, especially when you sleep in your hair braids.

Since the texture of the silk helps immensely when it comes to keeping your hair smooth and texturized, it’ll make your braids appear that much nicer in the morning. Also, you might as well make sure your hair is taken care of throughout the middle of the night while sleeping. Talk to a Hair Braiding Expert at HESS! Although braiding your hair may damage your strands, you can take extra precautions by braiding your hair gently. Try not to rush through braiding your hair by pulling and ripping your strands, but instead apply leave-in conditioner first and then braid.

  • This way your hair won’t be difficult to work with and you won’t have to rip apart your luscious locks.
  • This one takes time and practice, but making sure you pick the best braid for you is extremely important when sleeping in braids.
  • Not only is comfort important, but the way your hair looks in the morning when you pull your hair out of braids is key.

The more braids you have, the curlier it will be. French braids and tighter braids will also result in curlier/crimped hair as well. Choosing the right hair brands is also extremely important. Try picking hair bands that don’t damage your hair as much as straight-up rubber bands do. Stick with bands that have a fabric texture and are easy to deal with while sleeping. This is extremely important to remember.

  1. Unlike curling, is a little different when you try to make your whole section of hair evenly curly.
  2. When you tie your hair at the bottom, make sure you’ve braided as much as you can.
  3. This way your hair doesn’t have a weird non-curly section of hair at the bottom of your strands.
  4. Braiding or putting your hair in a ponytail when it’s wet can cause damage sooner because wet hair is more fragile.

Personally, whenever I sleep with wet hair braids, it doesn’t curl my hair as much as I’d like it to. It’s basically a win-win to sleep with dry hair. You won’t damage your hair as much, and it’ll look curlier! If you really want to protect your hair, I would buy a nightcap to keep your hair intact.

Sometimes, your braids can come undone in the middle of the night, so putting on a nightcap will ensure your locks stay all in one place. You won’t have to worry about having that one section of uncurled hair in the morning. Only the most reputable and trusted providers of hair braiding in and near Ypsilanti should be your go-to choice.

Hair Braiding, Hair Extensions, Hair Color,, and are just a few of the many services offered by Hair Essentials Salon Studios (HESS) in Ann Arbor, Michigan. A and a are also available. : 9 Truths To Know Before Sleeping In Braids To Ensure You Don’t Damage Your Hair

Is it better to plait hair wet or dry?

6. Wet hair braiding leads to bad odor – One of the main contributors to the musky smell of braids is braiding while the hair is wet. It happens because sweat gets caught in the scalp, and when you tie your hair, there is no place for it to escape. If you do not dry your hair appropriately, a mildew scent arises from wet braids.

Is it better to plait hair wet or dry?

6. Wet hair braiding leads to bad odor – One of the main contributors to the musky smell of braids is braiding while the hair is wet. It happens because sweat gets caught in the scalp, and when you tie your hair, there is no place for it to escape. If you do not dry your hair appropriately, a mildew scent arises from wet braids.

How long should I plait my hair?

I’d recommend 6 to 8 weeks and if you want to go longer, you have to really take good care of it to avoid a lot of breakage. Here are some thoughts that can help you take better care of your hair when it’s in braids: We recommend rehydrating your hair daily or every other day and not with water only.

Is it hard to plait your own hair?

How to Braid Hair: The Ultimate Guide for Beginners From the runway to your weekend coffee run, braided hairstyles always look on point! Braiding your hair keeps it out of your face, protects your strands from damage, and allows you to create an endless variety of fast heat-free styles for both formal and everyday occasions.

How do you start braiding hair? How long does your hair have to be to braid? How do you do a simple braid? How to braid your own hair to the scalp How to braid hair for beginners How to French braid your own hair How to Dutch braid your own hair How to braid short hair How to box braid your own hair How to braid hair for men

If you’re looking to start braiding your own hair, you might be wondering how to make your braids look neat and stylish. The key to awesome braids is prepping your hair properly. Taking a few extra moments to comb through your strands, apply product, and create clean sections will pay off with a more aesthetic hairstyle that holds for longer. The length required to braid hair depends on your hair type and desired style. At a minimum, your hair must be long enough that it can be parted, combed to the side and gripped securely between your finger and thumb. If you have short to mid-length hair, you may be wondering if your hair is long enough to braid.

  • Good news- the answer is probably YES! With 2-3 inches of hair you can create small cornrows or micro braids close to the scalp.
  • If you have 3-5 inches of hair (equivalent to a long pixie cut or “medium length” mens haircut), you can achieve a wider variety of styles, from waterfall braided bangs to side braids and even small French braids.

Longer hair is best for milkmaid braids, braided buns, crown braids and chunky, dramatic braids. However, if you don’t have long, thick hair you can still create these fun styles- just clip in your favorite hair extensions before you start braiding! A simple three-strand braid is one of the easiest styles to master. But basic doesn’t have to be boring! A few stylist-approved tricks can elevate this quick-and-easy braid to a beautiful classic look. Here’s how to create a perfect three-strand braid: Step #1: Comb and prep.

  • Make sure you start with dry, combed-out hair.
  • This is a great EASY style to wear in-between shampoos! For a volume boost, work a palmful of into your hair before styling.
  • Step #2: Apply styling paste.
  • Put a dab of in your hand, rub your palms together to emulsify the product, and smooth it through your hair from mid-shafts (ear level) to ends.

Step #3: Section your hair. You can either create a center braid that falls down the middle of your back, or bring your hair over one shoulder for a side braid. Divide your hair into three equal sections and secure each one with a clear elastic to keep the sections neat.

Step #4: Pick up one of your side sections and cross it OVER the middle section. (For a side braid, start with the section nearest your face.) This now becomes the new middle piece. Gently pull the braid tight. Step #5: Pick up the section from the opposite side and cross it OVER the middle section. Again, this piece is now your new middle section.

Gently pull the braid tight. Step#6: Repeat Steps Four and Five until you reach the ends of your hair. Maintain light tension by firmly gripping each section as you work. Step #7: Secure the ends with a clear elastic. Gently pull the braid apart for more volume (if desired), tidy up any flyaways, mist your braid with and you’re good to go! Cornrows, also known as scalp braids, are a great way to give natural or relaxed hair a rest from chemical treatments while protecting your delicate strands.

  1. These beautiful braids can be as simple or as intricate as you want to make them.
  2. For braid beginners, it’s a good idea to start with basic front-to-back cornrows.Follow these steps to braid your own hair to the scalp: Step #1: Prep your hair.
  3. Wash, deep-condition and detangle your hair with a wide tooth comb.

Apply to your damp hair and blow dry, or allow it to air-dry. Next, apply a small amount of to your palms and work it into your hair from tips to roots. This will give your braids better grip while reducing frizz. Step #2: Section the hair. You can create any size of braids that you prefer- just be sure to keep your sections consistent.

Use the tail of your comb to separate a section of hair from your face to the back of your head. Starting on either the left or right side (by sectioning the hair just above your ear) is generally easier than starting in the center. Secure the rest of your hair with clips to keep your sections neat. Step #3: Prepare to braid.

Part off a small piece of hair at the front of your section, next to your hairline. Divide this hair into three equal pieces. Hold the left and center pieces in your left hand, and grip the right piece in your right hand. Maintain a firm grip, but avoid pulling on the hair, which could result in painfully tight cornrows.

Step #4: Start with a three-strand braid. Bring the left section UNDER the center section, then bring the right section UNDER the new center section. Step #5: Add hair to your cornrow. As you continue this underhand braid, begin adding small pieces of hair from each side before bringing the hair under the center section.

Use your index finger as a “hook” to reach under the center section, pick up more hair and add it to the side section. Then bring the side section UNDER the center section. Pick up the same amount of hair each time for a balanced shape. Step #6: Detangle as you go.

  1. If you find your hair gets tangled while you braid, use your fingers to gently comb through any knots.
  2. Step #7: Finish the braid.
  3. Once all the hair from the section has been braided to your scalp, finish your cornrow with a three-strand braid (if your hair is long).
  4. If needed, secure the ends of the braid with a small hair elastic.

Step #8: Repeat with the rest of your hair. Follow Steps Two-Seven until all of your hair has been braided to the scalp. For classic cornrows, create straight parts and uniform sections so that the braids look even. Once you master the basic cornrow technique, there are endless styling possibilities to try out! “I love your hair- did you do that yourself?” Even if you’ve never done any style more complicated than a ponytail, it’s easy to start braiding hair as a beginner. The truth is that most braids are actually very simple patterns (even if they look super-complicated!).

For a beginner, the hardest part is often learning how to grip the hair and create a braid that looks balanced from top to bottom.If you’re new to braiding, the best place to start is with the basic three-strand braid. This simple technique forms the foundation for all other braids and braided hairstyles.

Try these tips to master the skill of braiding: Practice, practice, practice! It helps to practice braiding in front of a mirror with all your hair swept over one shoulder to the front. If you’re right-handed, start by braiding your hair over your right shoulder; if you’re a lefty, braid your hair over your left shoulder.

You can also practice braiding shoelaces, fabric strips, or even licorice ropes! Never skip prepping your hair. It’s important to start with dry or slightly-damp hair (wet hair stretches too easily and is prone to breakage). Always comb through any tangles and apply a lightweight for easier braiding. Create neat, even sections.

Divide your hair into three equal sections: left, middle and right. Comb through the sections and secure each one with a small clear elastic to keep them separated. Find your rhythm. Starting with the side section closest to your face, cross it over the middle section.

  1. Then take the section on the opposite side and cross it over the new middle strand.
  2. Repeat this simple pattern- right over center, left over center, right over center, left over center- until you reach the ends of your hair.
  3. Don’t drop your hair! Do your braids tend to come out too loose? Be sure to maintain a firm grip on each section, especially the center section, while you braid your hair.

As you bring a side piece into the center, use the thumb and pointer finger of the opposite hand to grab it in a pincer grip with your fingers close to the braid. Maintain light, consistent tension and gently cinch the braid after every stitch to keep it from sliding out of shape.

Add a finishing touch. After braiding your hair, secure the ends with a clear elastic. For a fuller braid, “pancake” your hair by gently pulling out small pieces. Use your fingers to adjust the shape until it’s just right, then finish with a to keep your braid in place. Now that you’ve mastered the basic three-strand braid, what’s next? Get creative with your classic braids by styling your hair in two plaits, or braid one small section of your hair and leave the rest loose for a fun casual look.Another great versatile braid for beginners to learn is the French braid.

It looks way harder than it is, and keeps your hair in place even on windy days! Read on to discover exactly how to French braid your own hair. French braids look so pretty but they can be a little challenging to do on your own hair! Unlike a basic three-strand braid, you’ll be adding hair from the sides as you braid.The secret is to braid tightly and add small, consistent sections of hair. To avoid looking like a Pinterest failure, follow these simple steps to correctly French braid your own hair: Step #1: Prepare your hair.

Make sure to start with dry, well-combed hair. Both freshly-washed and second-day hair will work for a French braid, but slightly dirty hair gives you better hold. Apply a dab of to your hands, emulsify the product, and work it through your hair for added grip. Step #2: Brush and section your hair. Tip your head slightly back and brush your hair straight back from your face.

Separate the hair on top of your head, from the temple areas to the crown, as if you were pulling back your hair for a half-up style. Divide this hair into three equal pieces. Step #3: Begin with a three-strand braid. Cross the right section over the center section, then cross the left section over the new center section.

This helps to strengthen the braid before you start adding hair. Step #4: Add hair from the right. Grip each of the three sections in your left hand and use your right hand to pick up a small piece of hair, creating a horizontal line from your right temple all the way to the side of the braid. Step #5: Incorporate this new hair into the right section, using your fingers to comb the hair together.

Then cross the right section over the center section to continue braiding. Step #6: Add hair from the left. Grip each of the three sections in your right hand and use your left hand to pick up a small piece of hair, this time from the left side of your head.

Be sure to create a clean line from your left temple all the way to the side of the braid. Step #7: Incorporate this new hair into the left section, combine the hair together, and cross the left section over the right section. Step #8: Repeat Steps Four-Seven until you reach the nape of the neck. Remember to add small, evenly sized sections of hair as you work down your head.

(Think about creating a pattern of horizontal stripes!) TIP: To avoid an unsightly bulge in your French braid, keep your hands close to your head and neck. As you incorporate the final sections of hair, avoid adding large pieces or lifting hair up to add it to the braid,

  1. Instead, continue working with small sections and moving the newly added hair straight across.
  2. Step #9: Braid the tail.
  3. Once all your hair has been incorporated into the braid, finish by braiding the rest of your hair in a three-strand braid.
  4. If needed, you can bring your hair over your shoulder at this point for easier access.

Step #10: Finish your French braid. Secure the braid with a clear elastic. If desired, pull apart small pieces from the center of the braid for a fuller look. (Do not pull on the sides, as this could cause hair to slip out of your braid.) Spray all over and use your hands to gently pat down any flyaways.

Mastering the art of French braiding takes a bit of time and practice, but this skill opens the doors to SO many amazing hairstyles! Try creating two French braids and securing them at the nape of your neck, leaving your ends loose and wavy. Or do a small face-framing French braid! We also love pinning up the ends of two French braids for a super-quick halo braid.

Wanna go Dutch? While Dutch braids look complicated, they’re actually just French braids in reverse! Instead of crossing the hair over the center section, you bring the hair underneath, For this reason, Dutch braids are sometimes referred to as inside-out or reverse French braids.

  • Dutch braids have a cool boxy shape and can be used to create countless trendy hairstyles.
  • This is a good style to learn after you’ve mastered the basic three-strand braid and the French braid.
  • Just follow these simple steps to Dutch braid your own hair: Step #1: Get ready.
  • Start with dry, well-combed hair.

Craving longer or thicker braids? Clip in your favorite hair extensions. Step #2: Part and section your hair. For two Dutch braids, use a tail comb to create a center part in your hair. Divide your hair into two sides, and clip one side out of the way. Step #3: Apply a dab of to your hands, emulsify the product, and work it through your strands for easier styling and less slippage.

  • Step #4: Create a small triangle-shaped section of hair at the front of your hairline.
  • The center part will form one side of this triangle, and your hairline will form the second side.
  • Use your fingers or a rat tail comb to create the third side of the triangle, and separate this section of hair.
  • Step #5: Split the triangle-shaped section into three equal pieces.

Step #6: Begin braiding. Pick up the piece of hair closest to your face and bring it UNDER the center section. This piece now becomes the new center section. Then pick up the piece farthest from your face and bring it UNDER the center section. Step #7: Add hair to your braid.

  1. As you continue braiding, add a small piece of hair to each section before bringing it under the center section.
  2. For a neat and balanced braid, make sure to add the same amount of hair each time and keep your sections clean.
  3. Step #8: Place your hands where you want your braid to go.
  4. As you continue braiding, direct the hair over and behind your ear.

Think about forming a diagonal line from your hairline towards the back of your head. Step #9: Finish with a three-strand braid. Once you have incorporated all the hair from that section, braid the rest of your hair in a classic three-strand braid. Continue bringing the side pieces UNDER the center piece for a consistent look. If you’re wondering, “Is my hair too short to braid?” you might be pleasantly surprised. While certain braided hairstyles work best with long flowing locks, there are many styles you can create with short hair.Some of the best braided hairstyles for short hair are those that involve adding hair to the braid, such as cornrows, French braids and Dutch braids.