How To Draw People

22.08.2023 0 Comments

How To Draw People

Is 30 too old to learn how do you draw?

Can You Learn How to Draw at Any Age? – As long as you have your faculties, you are fine, but as everyone over 45 will know, your body lets you down. It happens suddenly, you wake up one day and realize you can’t read without squinting. It comes as a shock I can tell you, especially if like me, you’re an illustrator.

But I had shock a few years before I was looking at a blank sheet of white paper and those annoying eye-floaters started to get in the way. They didn’t disappear, EVER, In fact, they get worse. It was, and is, like looking through a spider’s web. I was so freaked out that I went to the doctor, I thought I was going blind.

Nope, I was just getting old! The point I’m making is simple. Old age will determine what you can and can’t do. If you have high expectations of drawing super-realistic picture-perfect artworks when your eyes are bad and your hand trembles, you’re going to be disappointed.

  • Expectations are the key factor.
  • There’s no age limit on the learning process, given good health.
  • The theory side is straightforward and everyone learns how to draw using the same methods.
  • It’s a new skill and you can learn it.
  • In the end, it’s all about practice.
  • Join Sorie on Domestika with over 100,000 students taking her sketching classes.

You can progress and get better at drawing. With hard work, you can excel. What you can’t do is go beyond your capacity. We all have limits, if we didn’t then we would all reach the same level in life and there’d be no winners and losers. We all have an aptitude for different things in life and consequently, some people will have an inherent ability to draw better than others.

I remember drawing at high school and a friend, who could draw very well, came over and asked me how I see so much detail. I was mystified at the time. I couldn’t understand why he couldn’t see the same as me. It was only later in life that I realized that my perception was probably very different. I’m colorblind, and I read that a colorblind person has a greater tonal range.

I had a built-in advantage for drawing. It had less to do with natural talent, and more to do with the ability to see more. In other words, there are no guarantees that anyone taking up drawing later in life will achieve what they dream about. Everyone has a plateau.

By the same token, there are no rules to say that you won’t discover a hidden for drawing. Do you lack confidence? Take a class and get into the habit of drawing. I found this class on Udemy, 115,028 students can’t be wrong! Read this related post: Is Udemy Worth it? Pros and Cons For Artists and Designers In all honesty, most people will know, deep down, how good they were at drawing when they were young.

Whatever artistic talent you had can be improved upon. You can turn those basic skills, with regular practice, into an enjoyable hobby and creative outlet. Indeed, some people go further: How to Find Your Drawing Style: 8 Ways to Develop Your Skills It all depends on what you’re trying to accomplish.

You must experiment until you find a medium that clicks. That’s the reality for all artists. Very few artists can master everything, and that includes professional artists. They settle for what they can do well. I didn’t pick up a pencil for 5 years after leaving school. The skill level was still there. It was like riding a bike.

I could draw at school and I could draw as an adult factory hand. I was a little rusty but I soon picked it up again. I gave myself a year to learn how to paint. Being colorblind, I had to learn color without being able to see it properly. I couldn’t reliably mix paint, so I used soft pastels instead.

I had to learn certain tricks. For example, I learned that those fantastic evening skies, which I saw (and see) as warm greys, often contained pink. When I added pink it delighted my viewers, even though I couldn’t see it myself. When I stopped painting and switched back to drawing, I didn’t draw realism the way I do today.

I saw drawing as the preliminary stage of a painting. As far as I was concerned, a drawing was the structure or scaffold. I learned to add detail and form, to make the drawing a finished piece in its own right. Those skills slowly evolved in my 30s. By the time I was in my 40s, I could draw hyperrealism. Bottle Fed by Kevin Hayler Now I’m in my 60s and I’m backtracking. My eyes are not so good and my patience is getting shorter. I don’t want to spend weeks on one drawing. I prefer a quicker, sketchier style, I want to go back to the way I used to draw, in the beginning.

  • Read this: How to Draw Faster: 14 Expert Tips For Sketching at Speed Degas, one of my favorite artists, was forced to change his style as he grew older.
  • His early work was more classical and his style changed as his eyes failed.
  • Those amazing late impressionist paintings of ballerinas were the result of his inability to see much more than form and color.

The problem I have is retraining my brain to loosen up. It’s insanely hard for me to leave the detail out, now that I know how to put it in. I’m still learning to draw well.

How can I train myself to draw?

1. Try a daily drawing challenge – To kick things off, try a daily drawing challenge for a week, a month, or even longer. You may want to get a sketchbook to keep with you at all times, in case you find yourself suddenly inspired by your surroundings. Some new supplies may also motivate you to get into a good drawing rhythm.

Shot Link

Row 1: Jonathan Favari, Alexander Mostov, Radostina Georgieva,

Is it easy to draw a person?

Download Article Download Article Drawing a person may sound difficult, but it’s really a simple process if you approach it systematically. The easiest way to draw people is with the ‘Ball-and-Socket’ technique, a method in which the artist sketches several conjoined ovals to form the body parts of the human figure and draft the figure’s pose.

  1. 1 Sketch a scene. Don’t be too focused on how it looks, but make sure it matches what your people are wearing and style.
  2. 2 Sketch the wireframes and positions for your characters (or people). Remember that this is not the flesh, but just a kind of skeleton. Don’t forget to add ovals to bends. Advertisement
  3. 3 Sketch the body shapes needed to help you build the figures’ bodies.
  4. 4 Sketch the details for the faces, clothes, shoes, features, etc. Don’t forget to match the weather in your scene! Keep it simple, but not too simple. Changes are made for women and men. Women have thinner hips, but bigger torsos and waists. Men have more angular faces and features, while women’s are more round. Women also tend to have thinner necks.
    • Make sure that you aren’t sketching the people in your drawing at eye level. This looks very unrealistic; instead, try to adjust their head and/or posture a little bit.
  5. 5 Refine the sketch using a smaller tipped drawing tool. Smooth out each straight line to be more curved and humane. You don’t need a square-bodied person walking around! Make sure to add creases or lines coming out from the joints for more depth.
  6. 6 Draw the outline over the sketch. You can use a marker, pen or just push harder with the pencil.
  7. 7 Erase and remove the sketch marks.
  8. 8 Add color to the drawing. Sign your name if you wish. Keep true to your shading and scene. Make sure to sign your name on the bottom right and not anywhere else!
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  1. 1 Sketch the wireframes to create the pose for your people in the scene (sketch different colors to prevent confusion between figures).
  2. 2 Sketch the body shapes needed to help you build the figures’ bodies.
  3. 3 Sketch the details for the faces, clothes, features, etc.
  4. 4 Refine the sketch using a smaller tipped drawing tool.
  5. 5 Draw the outline over the sketch.
  6. 6 Erase and remove the sketch marks.
  7. 7 Add color to the drawing.
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  1. 1 Start with the upper body first. For the head, sketch a circle, and then add a sharp curve at the bottom of it to form an upside-down egg shape.
    • Draw the head so it’s slightly turned or angled a bit, as eye-level drawings don’t feel realistic.
  2. 2 Draw the neck next. You can usually just draw two short, straight lines roughly ears-width apart.
  3. 3 Draw a horizontal line perpendicular to the base of the neck but very lightly. This is a guideline for the figure’s collar bone. It should be about two to three head widths in length.
  4. 4 Sketch circles that are slightly smaller than the circle you drew for the head. The circle should be at either end of the collar guideline. These will be the shoulders.
  5. 5 Draw two ovals slightly longer than the vertical length of the head. Ensure that they are attached to the underside of the shoulder circles. These will be the upper arms/biceps.
  6. 6 Draw the torso at the points where the bicep ovals meet the shoulder circles. This can be achieved by drawing a kind of upside-down trapezoid shape for the chest, and two vertical lines for the abdominal trunk. Beneath that, draw an upside-down triangle for the pelvic area.
  7. 7 Draw a very small circle about half a head-length above the upside-down triangle. This is the belly button. To ensure your figure is proportionate, adjust the bicep ovals so that their bottoms are even with the height of the belly button. Draw a guideline if you need to.
  8. 8 Sketch two circles that are slightly larger than your shoulder circles. They should each be halfway inside the pelvic triangle. These are your hip joints.
  9. 9 Draw two long ovals (the same length as the torso) beneath the hip joint circles. These are the thighs.
  10. 10 Draw two smaller ovals for the knees, half-overlapping the bottoms of the thigh ovals.
  11. 11 Draw two more ovals beneath the knees for the calves/shins.
  12. 12 Sketch two triangles at the bottoms of the calf ovals. These are the feet.
  13. 13 Go back up to the biceps and draw two more ovals beneath them for the forearms.
  14. 14 Draw two small circles on the ends of the forearms for the hands.
  15. 15 Draw a smooth outline, add body details, and add clothing and accessories.
  16. 16 Finished.
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Add New Question

  • Question Should I use a pen or a pencil to draw people? Use pencil for the wire frame and the details so that you can erase as necessary, then go over the details and outline with something more refined and not eraseable so that when you erase the wire frame you only erase the wire frame and not the actual details.
  • Question What does it mean to “refine the drawing”? Refining (in art terms) means to “clean up” the sketchy mess underneath what’s going to be the proper piece. This usually involves erasing sketches, darkening outlines, etc.
  • Question How do I know when to make a creases on the clothes? Study photos of people in various poses, and note where the crease are. In general, they appear at the joins: ankles, wrists, knees, and elbows.

See more answers Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement

  • It can help to work with an art teacher as you learn how to draw faces and people. A teacher can help you develop more of an artist’s eye.
  • Don’t rush things, but be prolific. Draw often. Practice makes perfect!
  • Get in the habit of sketching lightly. This will make your eraser marks less obvious, as well as put less strain on your hands. You can always go back and darken your lines later, once you’re satisfied that you’ve sketched out what you want.

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  • Don’t feel like you have to draw it exactly like the drawing. Get messy, and make mistakes, that’s how you learn!
  • Some people may find nude figures or adult subject matter offensive. As an artist, you have the basic freedom to draw whatever you want, but be mindful of whom you are drawing, and where.
  • You may find yourself getting frustrated. If this is the case, take a break and come back to your drawing later.
  • Don’t be disappointed if you don’t believe that your drawings are good. Not everyone has the talent to be able to draw, but you will get better with practice.

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  • Pencil or pen
  • Eraser
  • Paper
  • Coloring materials such as crayons or colored pencils (optional)

Article Summary X To draw a person, start by sketching a basic wire frame for them that includes their head and body. Then, go back in and draw the shapes of their body parts, including their arms and legs. Once you’re finished drawing their body, sketch their clothes, hair, and facial features.

What do you draw first when drawing a person?

Hold Off on The GesturesFor Now – One important note about drawing armatures: This is not gesture drawing. Gesture drawings are a better way to build a drawing because they show both the pose and the proportion of your figure (like an armature does), but they also give your drawing a rhythm and flow.

The armature is a more concrete, rigid system that hones your sense of proportion and is an easy and clear way to build a pose. Gesture drawing is an important skill to master. But for now, stick with the armature as a way to help you see beyond the surface of your subject. Now let’s move on to a demonstration on drawing armatures.

The first step in drawing an armature is to draw an oval for the head. I start with the head because it establishes the proportion for the rest of the body. Pay particular attention to the angle at which the head tips to the left or right. When you draw your oval, you don’t need to go around and around. Just draw an ellipse in single lines once around or so. It helps to practice drawing circles of various sizes and elongations until you can draw a simple oval shape consistently.

How do people draw so good?

“Study of Arms and Hands” by Leonardo da Vinci, 1474. (Image credit: Public domain) Since the dawn of human art-making, the divide has been clear: There are people who can effortlessly sketch an object’s likeness, and people who struggle for hours just to get the angles and proportions right (by which point the picture is scarred by eraser marks, anyway).

  • What separates the drawers from the drawer-nots? Ongoing research is revealing the answer to this longstanding question.
  • It seems that realistic drawing ability hinges on three factors: how a person perceives reality, how well he or she remembers visual information from one moment to the next, and which elements of an object he or she selects to actually draw.

If you’re stuck on stick figures, the good news, according to researchers at the University College London, is that people can improve at all these mental processes with practice. First, people who can’t draw well aren’t seeing the world as it really is.

  • When we look at an object, our visual systems automatically misjudge such attributes as size, shape and color; research over the past three years shows at least some of these misperceptions translate into drawing errors.
  • Paradoxically, in other circumstances the misperceptions help us make sense of the world.

For example, objects appear larger when they are closer than when they are far away. Even so, the visual system practices “size constancy” by perceiving the object as being approximately one size no matter how far away it is. The visual system, “knowing” a distant object is really bigger than it appears, sends false information to the brain about what the eyeball is seeing.

  • People who have the most trouble judging apparent size, shape, color and brightness may also be the worst at drawing, recent research by Justin Ostrofsky and his colleagues at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York suggests.
  • Those who draw well are better able to override these visual misperceptions and perceive what their own eyeballs are really seeing.

However, inaccurately perceiving the image is only part of the story, said Rebecca Chamberlain, a psychologist at University College London. Chamberlain and her colleagues recently conducted experiments investigating the role of visual memory in the drawing process.

  • They believe that drawing skill results in part from an ability to remember simple relationships in an object ? such as an angle between two lines ? from the moment the angle is perceived to the moment it is drawn.
  • Additionally, “drawing seems to involve focusing on both holistic proportional relationships as well as focus on detail isolated from the whole.

Perhaps it is the ability to switch between these two modes of seeing that underpins successful drawing,” Chamberlain told Life’s Little Mysteries, Furthermore, as detailed in December in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, Ostrofsky and his colleagues found significant evidence that skilled artists are better at selecting which elements of an object need to be included to convey the object’s form.

And once the artists have selected an important element, they are better at focusing their attention on it and ignoring extraneous details nearby. The devil is in the details, and the researchers are still working out the interplay between all the factors that affect drawing accuracy. However, they can all be learned.

“There is no doubt that practice is an important component of being able to draw,” Chamberlain said. While some may be predisposed to be better at perceptual accuracy and visual memory than others, “the rest of us use tricks to emulate this.” In research presented at a recent symposium at Columbia University and soon to be published by Columbia University Press, Chamberlain and her colleagues found practicing drawing significantly improved people’s abilities over time, as rated by other people who participated in the study.

Based on their research, the psychologists recommended the following techniques for getting better at drawing: Focus on scaling a drawing to fit the size of the paper; anchor an object in its surroundings by showing how it sits in space; focus on the distance between elements of the object and on their relative sizes; and focus on the size and shape of “negative space,” or the empty space between parts of the object.

Lastly, they recommend thinking of “lines” as what they really are — boundaries between light and dark areas. As Chris McManus, a member of the research team, noted, “There are few human skills which don’t improve with practice.” Follow Natalie Wolchover on Twitter @ nattyover,

  1. Follow Life’s Little Mysteries on Twitter @ llmysteries and join us on Facebook,
  2. Stay up to date on the latest science news by signing up for our Essentials newsletter.
  3. Natalie Wolchover was a staff writer for Live Science from 2010 to 2012 and is currently a senior physics writer and editor for Quanta Magazine.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Tufts University and has studied physics at the University of California, Berkeley. Along with the staff of Quanta, Wolchover won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory writing for her work on the building of the James Webb Space Telescope.

Why do I like drawing humans?

Why is portrait drawing so good for you? – It’s not a coincidence that portrait drawing is part of practically every art degree and there are more books, videos and articles on the matter than you can count. Everyone loves a good portrait. We love to draw them, look at them and wonder about the person in it. Even ‘Mr Landscape’ himself, Claude Monet, couldn’t resist the occasional portrait, such as this drawing of a woman (c.1890) with red chalk One reason is that we humans are biologically programmed to be drawn to faces and connect with them. It is part of our survival to live in small, sociable packs and be able to read each other’s facial expressions.

  1. Which is why it’s so easy for a human face to convey certain feelings, as compared to, say a bowl of fruit or a grand cathedral.
  2. And we all like art that makes us feel something,
  3. Another reason for the popularity of portraits is their freedom of composition,
  4. Unlike subjects, such as architecture and landscapes you can arrange your subject to a certain degree.

You can change the angle of their head, the hair, clothes, create your own lighting situation, even ask for a specific facial expression. There is a vast number of different expressions, and thus feelings, we can convey with our lips alone. It’s truly amazing how even the slightest adaption can completely change the feel of the drawing.

  1. For more detail on how to create an interesting composition for a portrait drawing visit my article,
  2. Also have a look at my post for some general tips on the topic and lots of examples.
  3. A lot of artists appreciate the underlying set of rules that can be followed when drawing an anatomically correct human face.

In fact, there are a lot of very simple proportion principles at work here, which can be learned relatively quickly and applied instantly in practice. For example, the eyes (not the nose) are roughly in the vertical middle of the head and they are about another eye’s width apart (in a full front view). Self-Portrait (1570) by Giuseppe Arcimboldo Aside from this basic set of guidelines however portraits are quite tricky to do well. A good thing, then, that most of us artists enjoy the occasional challenge. Drawing the human face, especially when you’re aiming for a good likeness needs a good eye and a lot of practice.

Facial proportions are quite unforgiving and a nose or mouth that’s off by as little as a few millimetres can make the entire drawing look wrong. Not to worry, I’ve created, so you can get a lot of practice in to perfect your skills. Overall though, even with the added level of difficulty, there is no better way to learn shading,

Shadows are a crucial part of a realistic portrait, because unlike other subjects like architecture or landscapes there are hardly any “hard borders” in a face. Often shadows are the only elements to distinguish features, such as the bridge of the nose, from the rest of the face.

Where do I start to draw humans?

Start with Basic Poses – By getting a strong grasp of basic poses like the standing position and sitting position, you’ll be able to draw more variations of poses easier. Before you can learn to run, you must first learn how to walk. Drawing people well means learning to recreate body poses.

However, there are some that are simply easier than others. One of the tips for drawing people many artists overlook is to start with basic poses before you jump into anything too crazy. Learning to start with basic poses doesn’t only help you with drawing people, but if you wanted to learn how to draw dogs or draw cars, it is a fantastic start.

It is easier to draw someone standing than it is to draw them in a complex action pose. Consider these basic poses as a starting point for your process. Learning the way people hold their bodies naturally will help you to understand them in more complex settings.

Is 13 too late to start drawing?

Photo via Pixabay Tips Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links. That means if you buy something we get a small commission at no extra cost to you( learn more ) It’s never too late to learn how to draw. This advice can be found everywhere in books, online videos, and trumpeted by teachers at all levels.

  1. But people who want to become industry pros often have a related question.
  2. Is it possible to become a professional artist with no experience drawing as a child? If you check out interviews from professional artists you’ll find 90% of the time they all started as kids.
  3. Most pros will admit they’ve been drawing since their age was in the single digits.

It’s “just something they always did”. But not everyone is fortunate enough to have that experience. Yes kids like to scribble with crayons for fun. But drawing as a kid and sticking with it through adolescence is a common factor amongst talented employed artists.

Is 17 too late to start drawing?

You find this new form of expression and ideas just pour out. Is it too late to start drawing at the age of 17? No,it’s not too late to start drawing, especially not at 17,you’re still young you have time. Drawing is a skill you acquire over time,all you need is consistent practice daily.

Is 15 too late to draw?

It’s never too late. Although, at 15 years old you are still very young and have plenty of years to develop your artistic skills. It’s never too late.

Why am I not motivated to draw?

How do you motivate yourself to draw when you feel like crap, have no energy and you’ve run out of coffee? We’ve all been there but there are strategies that can help. Such as: The motivation to draw requires self-discipline and a routine. Give your day a work structure, get up at the same time, start work at the same time, give yourself small goals, and follow through.

Take mini-breaks, finish at the same, and give yourself a treat. Repeat, and make it a habit. Self-motivation is essential for professional artists. If you are serious about making a success of your art career, you must stay motivated to push yourself forward. It’s not easy. Life gets in the way, What follows are 11 ways to motivate yourself even when you are not in the mood.

What follows are 11 ways to motivate yourself even if you are not in the mood. Ok, let’s go 11 Ways to Motivate Yourself as an Artist, (I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. However, I only promote products I like and recommend)

Can drawing be self taught?

You are here: Home / Art Education / How to Become a Successful Self-Taught Artist in 2023 “Is it okay to be a self-taught artist?” You may have wondered at some point on your art journey. Of course it’s okay to be self-taught! After all, you don’t need to go to an art school or receive a fancy degree in order to make art and call yourself an artist.

What it means to be an artist who is self-taught and not trainedThe benefits and disadvantages that self-taught artists experiencePractical advice to help untrained artists become as disciplined and skilled as trained artists

By the time you’re done reading, you’ll know how to take actionable steps to improve your art education and become a better artist!

Can you learn to draw without talent?

How long does it take to learn to draw and paint? – This is a question that often plagues aspiring artists. The answer, unfortunately, is that it varies depending on the person. Some people may be able to learn quickly, while others may take longer.The important thing to remember is to be patient and to practice.

  1. Practice is essential for becoming good at drawing and painting.
  2. There are various resources available for learning to draw and paint, such as books, websites, and classes.Famous artists who managed to learn to paint and draw despite not having any natural talent include Vincent van Gogh and Pablo Picasso.

This proves that it is possible to learn.So, if you’re feeling discouraged, remember that you can learn to draw and paint, no matter how long it takes. Just be patient and keep practicing. And who knows, maybe one day you’ll be as famous as van Gogh or Picasso.If you want to become a great artist, you need to put in the practice.

  1. It’s as simple as that.
  2. Practice makes perfect, and the more you practice the better you will become.Some people believe that you need to be born with talent in order to be a good artist, but this is not true.
  3. Anyone can learn to draw or paint with enough practice.
  4. Some of the most famous artists in history were not born with talent, but they practiced regularly and became great artists.There are a number of ways to practice, such as taking classes, watching tutorials, or practicing on your own.

There are also a number of benefits to practicing regularly, such as improving your skills, gaining confidence, and becoming more creative. So if you want to learn how to draw or paint, make sure to practice regularly. It is the best way to improve your skills and become a great artist.

What is the easiest way to draw people?

Download Article Download Article Drawing a person may sound difficult, but it’s really a simple process if you approach it systematically. The easiest way to draw people is with the ‘Ball-and-Socket’ technique, a method in which the artist sketches several conjoined ovals to form the body parts of the human figure and draft the figure’s pose.

  1. 1 Sketch a scene. Don’t be too focused on how it looks, but make sure it matches what your people are wearing and style.
  2. 2 Sketch the wireframes and positions for your characters (or people). Remember that this is not the flesh, but just a kind of skeleton. Don’t forget to add ovals to bends. Advertisement
  3. 3 Sketch the body shapes needed to help you build the figures’ bodies.
  4. 4 Sketch the details for the faces, clothes, shoes, features, etc. Don’t forget to match the weather in your scene! Keep it simple, but not too simple. Changes are made for women and men. Women have thinner hips, but bigger torsos and waists. Men have more angular faces and features, while women’s are more round. Women also tend to have thinner necks.
    • Make sure that you aren’t sketching the people in your drawing at eye level. This looks very unrealistic; instead, try to adjust their head and/or posture a little bit.
  5. 5 Refine the sketch using a smaller tipped drawing tool. Smooth out each straight line to be more curved and humane. You don’t need a square-bodied person walking around! Make sure to add creases or lines coming out from the joints for more depth.
  6. 6 Draw the outline over the sketch. You can use a marker, pen or just push harder with the pencil.
  7. 7 Erase and remove the sketch marks.
  8. 8 Add color to the drawing. Sign your name if you wish. Keep true to your shading and scene. Make sure to sign your name on the bottom right and not anywhere else!
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  1. 1 Sketch the wireframes to create the pose for your people in the scene (sketch different colors to prevent confusion between figures).
  2. 2 Sketch the body shapes needed to help you build the figures’ bodies.
  3. 3 Sketch the details for the faces, clothes, features, etc.
  4. 4 Refine the sketch using a smaller tipped drawing tool.
  5. 5 Draw the outline over the sketch.
  6. 6 Erase and remove the sketch marks.
  7. 7 Add color to the drawing.
  8. Advertisement

  1. 1 Start with the upper body first. For the head, sketch a circle, and then add a sharp curve at the bottom of it to form an upside-down egg shape.
    • Draw the head so it’s slightly turned or angled a bit, as eye-level drawings don’t feel realistic.
  2. 2 Draw the neck next. You can usually just draw two short, straight lines roughly ears-width apart.
  3. 3 Draw a horizontal line perpendicular to the base of the neck but very lightly. This is a guideline for the figure’s collar bone. It should be about two to three head widths in length.
  4. 4 Sketch circles that are slightly smaller than the circle you drew for the head. The circle should be at either end of the collar guideline. These will be the shoulders.
  5. 5 Draw two ovals slightly longer than the vertical length of the head. Ensure that they are attached to the underside of the shoulder circles. These will be the upper arms/biceps.
  6. 6 Draw the torso at the points where the bicep ovals meet the shoulder circles. This can be achieved by drawing a kind of upside-down trapezoid shape for the chest, and two vertical lines for the abdominal trunk. Beneath that, draw an upside-down triangle for the pelvic area.
  7. 7 Draw a very small circle about half a head-length above the upside-down triangle. This is the belly button. To ensure your figure is proportionate, adjust the bicep ovals so that their bottoms are even with the height of the belly button. Draw a guideline if you need to.
  8. 8 Sketch two circles that are slightly larger than your shoulder circles. They should each be halfway inside the pelvic triangle. These are your hip joints.
  9. 9 Draw two long ovals (the same length as the torso) beneath the hip joint circles. These are the thighs.
  10. 10 Draw two smaller ovals for the knees, half-overlapping the bottoms of the thigh ovals.
  11. 11 Draw two more ovals beneath the knees for the calves/shins.
  12. 12 Sketch two triangles at the bottoms of the calf ovals. These are the feet.
  13. 13 Go back up to the biceps and draw two more ovals beneath them for the forearms.
  14. 14 Draw two small circles on the ends of the forearms for the hands.
  15. 15 Draw a smooth outline, add body details, and add clothing and accessories.
  16. 16 Finished.
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Add New Question

  • Question Should I use a pen or a pencil to draw people? Use pencil for the wire frame and the details so that you can erase as necessary, then go over the details and outline with something more refined and not eraseable so that when you erase the wire frame you only erase the wire frame and not the actual details.
  • Question What does it mean to “refine the drawing”? Refining (in art terms) means to “clean up” the sketchy mess underneath what’s going to be the proper piece. This usually involves erasing sketches, darkening outlines, etc.
  • Question How do I know when to make a creases on the clothes? Study photos of people in various poses, and note where the crease are. In general, they appear at the joins: ankles, wrists, knees, and elbows.

See more answers Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement

  • It can help to work with an art teacher as you learn how to draw faces and people. A teacher can help you develop more of an artist’s eye.
  • Don’t rush things, but be prolific. Draw often. Practice makes perfect!
  • Get in the habit of sketching lightly. This will make your eraser marks less obvious, as well as put less strain on your hands. You can always go back and darken your lines later, once you’re satisfied that you’ve sketched out what you want.

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  • Don’t feel like you have to draw it exactly like the drawing. Get messy, and make mistakes, that’s how you learn!
  • Some people may find nude figures or adult subject matter offensive. As an artist, you have the basic freedom to draw whatever you want, but be mindful of whom you are drawing, and where.
  • You may find yourself getting frustrated. If this is the case, take a break and come back to your drawing later.
  • Don’t be disappointed if you don’t believe that your drawings are good. Not everyone has the talent to be able to draw, but you will get better with practice.

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  • Pencil or pen
  • Eraser
  • Paper
  • Coloring materials such as crayons or colored pencils (optional)

Article Summary X To draw a person, start by sketching a basic wire frame for them that includes their head and body. Then, go back in and draw the shapes of their body parts, including their arms and legs. Once you’re finished drawing their body, sketch their clothes, hair, and facial features.

Should I learn to draw people first?

If you like to do character portraits study face first. If you want to do action poses do gesture first. It’s up to you. You’re eventually going to have to do both though.

How long does it take for a person to learn to draw?

How long does it take to learn to draw well? – It will take roughly two years if you’ve never held a pencil before and drawn anything at all. If you’re going from an absolute newbie to somewhat capable of drawing, it will take two years to learn to draw.

  • Let me elaborate.
  • Firstly, please note that nobody is born with talent or skill.
  • It is a myth when people say that “art runs in your genes.” No, art does not run in anyone’s genes.
  • You may have a strong passion for art or be drawn to drawing (pun intended).
  • And the rest is up to you.
  • You will have to start from scratch and slowly build up your drawing skills.

If you practice daily for 30 minutes to an hour, you can easily pick up the skill in one to one a half years. If you practice drawing 4-6 hours a day, you can definitely reduce that time to months or a year. However, learning to draw depends on the following:

Your ability to make quick strokes Your hand and wrist movements The power of your observation skills Your ability to comprehend color theory and draw emotions Your ability to translate what you imagine to your canvas/paper How fast you pick up drawing How many hours you put into drawing every day Whether you are learning by yourself or have somebody teaching you.

Some of these quantifiers cannot be determined until you start drawing. For instance, I can draw people and characters very well. But I don’t know how to sketch scenery or a landscape. I don’t have much practice in that arena, so it would take me a while to learn how to do that.