How Much Does It Cost To Charge A Tesla

22.08.2023 0 Comments

How Much Does It Cost To Charge A Tesla

How much does it cost to charge a Tesla at a regular charging station?

How Much Does It Cost To Charge a Tesla at a Charging Station? – The cost to charge your Tesla at a charging station can range from free to $43. Several factors can change this cost, the most important being the size of your Tesla battery pack and your location.

After all, different-sized batteries take different amounts of time to charge and the cost of electricity varies by location. The amount of money you’ll pay to charge your vehicle at a charging station largely depends on the charging station you use as well. Prices at Electrify America stations range from $0.31 to $0.43 per kilowatt hour.

However, some charging stations, like Volta stations, are ad- and retailer-supported, and they are completely free to use. Considering most Tesla vehicles have a 50 kWh battery, the cost to charge the vehicle at a charging station ranges from absolutely free to $21.50.

How much is it to charge a Tesla Model 3?

Cost of charging a Tesla Model 3 To fully charge the battery in the 2021 Standard Range Model 3, you can anticipate paying around $7.65.

How much does it cost to charge a Tesla UK?

Cost to charge an electric car at rapid chargers – Rapid chargers are typically found in motorway service stations and range from being free to one of the more expensive ways to charge.

Most network rapid chargers cost 73p/kwh which is about £22 for 30 minutes of charging (as of March 2023).The Tesla Supercharger Network has points across the UK which are either free (dependent on the vehicle age) or pay-per-use for owners of Tesla electric vehicles.Other sites can be found around the UK and typically have an associated tariff that is chosen by the operator.

Tip: Rapid charging is unlikely to be a part of your day-to-day charging routine, as your other charging will fulfil most of your needs, usually at lower cost. But access to well placed rapid chargers is critical for longer journeys.

How long do Tesla batteries last?

According to the Tesla website, the answer to the question of how long do Tesla batteries last over their lifetime is between 300,000 to 500,000 miles, which equates to 22 to 37 years, but most estimates agree that the time frame is closer to around 8-12 years.

How long does it take to charge a Tesla at 220V?

Furthermore, on a 220V system, most Tesla vehicles charge from 40% to 80% in roughly an hour. However, it will take another two hours to charge from 80 percent to 100 percent.

How fast does a Tesla charge?

Charge Speed Comparison

Hardware Charge Speed
Wall Connector Up to 44 miles of range per hour charged Order Now
Mobile Connector Up to 3 miles of range per hour charged Order Now
Supercharger Up to 200 miles in 15 minutes of charge Find a Supercharger

Can Tesla be charged anywhere?

Where can I charge Tesla Models – Teslas can be charged at any of the 40,000+ electric vehicle charging locations nationwide, including Hertz, Tesla, third-party and public locations. You can also connect to a standard 120V household outlet using the Mobile Connector kit.

How many miles can a Tesla go on a full charge?

How long does a Tesla car battery last? – On a single charge, the smallest Tesla battery capacity (in the Model 3) will last for 262 miles, The highest range Tesla offers is 405 miles for one full charge of their Model S battery. Importantly, these numbers are not always exact, and it is important to always be proactive about charging your Tesla.

Can I charge my Tesla to 100?

If you really need the range, go up to 90-95%. Thou shalt not charge your Tesla to 100%, unless you absolutely must. Credit: Smith Collection/Gado / gettyimages Electric car batteries should not, generally, be charged to 100%. Long-term, this reduces the battery’s longevity, and Tesla cars actually charge up to 90% by default.

  1. But if you’re pressed for range, should you change this and charge up to 100%? Well, unless you absolutely must squeeze every bit of range out of your battery, the answer is still no.
  2. It’s not just about battery degradation.
  3. In a recent Twitter exchange, Tesla CEO Elon Musk explained that regenerative braking does not kick in at full charge, meaning the car is less energy efficient.

A Tesla Model 3 owner asked Musk whether she should charge up to 100%, given her commute is a total of 160 miles, which leaves little wiggle room to do much else with the car without a recharge. Her Model 3 is the Standard Range Plus variety, which has 240 miles of range at full battery capacity, but this drops to about 216 miles at the default 90% charge setting.

  • Musk’s answer is that she should still charge to 90% or 95%, to reap the full benefit of regenerative braking.
  • Tweet may have been deleted Regenerative braking is the tech that turns braking energy into electricity, extending the car’s range by re-felling the battery.
  • Its effectiveness varies by a number of factors, but there are reports of it extending a Tesla’s range by as much as 30%.

So charging the battery to 95% might actually be almost as good, range-wise, as charging to 100%. To know exactly how close the numbers get, one would have to know when, exactly, regenerative braking kicks in. I’ve pinged Musk for the answer and will update the article if I get it, but anecdotal evidence from Tesla forums suggests that it happens when the battery is anywhere from 84% to 94% capacity, so roughly in line with what Musk had said – but ambient temperature is also a factor, so your mileage (literally) may vary. Stan is a Senior Editor at Mashable, where he has worked since 2007. He’s got more battery-powered gadgets and band t-shirts than you. He writes about the next groundbreaking thing. Typically, this is a phone, a coin, or a car. His ultimate goal is to know something about everything.

Which is the cheapest Tesla?

How Much Is a Tesla Model 3? – As the cheapest Tesla available, the Model 3 has a lot to offer, including strong range and sleek styling. The rear-drive Standard Range Plus model had already seen its base price jump to as high as $48,190 as of March 2022, but Tesla has undone some of those increases, dropping the out-the-door MSRP to $43,990.

With the new $1,390 destination charge, that placed the least-expensive Model 3 at $45,380 before another pair of recent reductions of $1,000 dragged the out-the-door price to $43,380. It’s now down to to $41,630 including destination. This car has an estimated driving range of 267 miles. The Long Range model was but no longer is on hiatus on Tesla’s website; it delivers an EPA-rated 353 miles of range and had started at $59,190, but now starts at $47,240 as of May 2023.

The racier Performance model manages an EPA-rated 315 miles of range on a full charge and is now priced at $55,380 with destination—way down from the $64,190 Tesla had been charging for one. Both Long Range and Performance models come standard with all-wheel-drive courtesy of an individual electric motor at each axle.

Is it cheaper to charge Tesla?

Is supercharging still cheaper than gas? – The cost of charging a Tesla is more than three times cheaper per mile than the cost of fueling a gas-powered car. EnergySage estimates that it costs $614.95 to charge your Tesla per year. In comparison, gas-powered cars cost an average of $1,850.42 to fuel per year.

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Is it cheaper to charge Tesla at home or at Supercharger UK?

How Much Does It Cost To Charge A Tesla At Home? – Charging at home is cheaper and more convenient than charging in public. Your electricity rate per minute will depend on your provider and where in the UK you live. Providers can’t charge more than 34p per kWh, however, you can find out how much you pay by looking at your electric bill.

How far can a Tesla travel?

Can Teslas Go Long Distance? – The distance you can go when you are driving a Tesla depends entirely on the model you choose to purchase. In addition, several other factors can affect the range a Tesla can go on a single charge. Depending on the model of Tesla you choose, it can travel a variety of distances on a single charge.

  1. The typical range is between about 267 and 400 miles.
  2. This means that, yes, a Tesla can go long distances.
  3. It’s important to keep in mind that while you can drive that far with a single charge, you’ll find charging stations in cities around the world.
  4. This means that if your vehicle needs to be charged, you can do so along the way.

Because the mileage range can vary depending on the model, it’s worth it to learn more about the available options. Here’s a breakdown of the distances that different Tesla models can travel on a single charge.

Will a Tesla last 10 years?

Your Tesla Can Last for Over a Decade – If you’re an average driver, you can expect to drive your Tesla for more than a decade before you think about a battery replacement. Beyond that, your Tesla can clock over one million miles if you replace the batteries and motor.

Will a Tesla battery last 10 years?

FAQs –

How often does a Tesla battery need to be replaced? There haven’t been many electric cars that needed battery replacement, but according to Elon Musk, your Tesla batteries last for 300,000 to 500,000 miles, or 1,500 battery cycles. That’s around 22 to 37 years for someone driving an average of 40 miles a day.

How much does it cost to replace a Tesla battery? Musk claims that a new battery for a Model 3 car can set you back around $5,000 to $7,000. That’s exclusive of labor costs. These prices are expected to decrease once the cost of batteries themselves decreases. Expect to spend between $20,000 and $22,000 for battery replacement.

How quickly do Teslas charge? This will depend on the Tesla model and the charger you’re using. Tesla models have varying ranges, and, therefore, varying charging times (a bigger battery will also take longer to charge).

What happens if Tesla runs out of battery? The short and simple answer is the car will stop and you’ll need a towing service to take your car to the nearest charging station. Your Tesla will warn you about low battery, so don’t worry about suddenly running out of juice mid-drive.

How far can a Tesla go on one charge at 70 mph? ‘s 70 mph test got 310 miles of range on one charge of a 2021 Tesla Model 3 AWD; 43 miles short of its claimed range of 353 miles. The 2021 Model S Plaid with 21″ wheels recorded 300 miles for one full charge, 48 miles lesser than its advertised range.

What is the range a Tesla has after one charge? A standard model Tesla can get at least 267 miles of range for a single charge. However, the Model S Long Range can go an estimated 375 miles.

How do I charge my Tesla? Charging your Tesla vehicles to around 80% to 90% is advisable to maintain battery health. Also, avoid letting your battery charge fall below 20%.

How do I check if the battery on a used Tesla is still good? Tracking a Tesla’s mileage and battery capacity over time is the easiest way to check battery life. It’s due for a battery replacement once it has lost 20% of its range. Tesla owners reportedly only lose 5% after 100,000 miles.

Is battery degradation a consideration when buying a used Tesla? Tesla’s battery technology makes your electric vehicle more reliable over time, with studies suggesting that there is only a 10% decrease in performance after 160,000 miles. So, you can expect top performance from your car until then. In case your battery stops performing, a battery warranty covers 8 years or 100,000 to 150,000 miles of range – whichever comes first.

Do different Tesla models have different batteries? Tesla uses lithium-ion batteries in all its vehicles, but they’re not all the same. There are four main types of batteries across their EVs: 18650-type, 2170-type, 4680-type, and the prismatic-type Tesla battery.

What is the lifespan of a Tesla battery? Tesla car batteries can last for 300,000 to 500,000 miles, or 1,500 battery cycles. That’s around 22 to 37 years if you’re driving 40 miles per day.

: How Long Does a Tesla Battery Last?

Will a Tesla battery last 20 years?

How Long Does a Tesla Battery Last? – Tesla batteries don’t go by time but by usage. According to a Tweet by Elon Musk, Tesla batteries should last between 300,000 and 500,000 miles. Based on an average driving distance of 260 miles per week, a new Tesla battery can last anywhere between 22 and 37 years.

However, how long your Tesla battery will last depends on how you take care of the EV battery, For instance, you can degrade your EV battery faster if you often supercharge it. In addition to that, your EV battery could degrade faster if it’s exposed to extremely low or high temperatures and if it is frequently rapid-charged.

Regardless, you can expect your battery to still have around 70 to 75% of its capacity after around eight years of use, when an average user is expected to cover between 100,000 to 150,000 miles. Beyond that, Tesla guarantees that it will replace the battery if it degrades by more than 30% during its eight-year warranty period.

How long does a Tesla last?

Tesla Model S – So, before things get underway, let’s get something out of the way. Longevity for an EV isn’t going to be dependent on routine maintenance. An electric vehicle has no fluids to keep the motor lubricated nor a traditional transmission in need of flushing.

As such, the key factor in determining the lifespan of the vehicle comes down to the battery. The battery pack comprises a large majority of the cost for most EVs, and the luxury Tesla Model S is no exception. According to Tesla directly, the Model S and all other models are rated for around 300,000 to 500,000 miles.

There have been users with older Model S Teslas, before the battery revision, who have clocked some serious mileage, however. One user has a 2015 Tesla Model S, with around 146,000 miles on the odometer. The battery capacity lost at the time of this writing was only around 10% with the cells still exhibiting 90% of their lifespan. The Tesla model S should last for about 300,000 to 500,000 miles. ©canadianPhotographer56/Shutterstock.com

Can you charge a Tesla on a normal outlet?

Home Charging Installation – How long does it take to install home charging equipment? Home charging equipment installation can take several hours. More complicated jobs may take up to two days. How much does installing a Tesla home charging equipment cost? Installation costs vary depending on the electrical system and the type of installation.

  • Tesla provides a list of recommended electricians in your area who can provide you a quote.
  • Can I use a normal 120 volt outlet to charge? You can use a NEMA 5-15 adapter for a 120 volt outlet,
  • This provides approximately two to four miles of range per hour of charge depending on the car.
  • For the best home charging experience, we recommend installing a Wall Connector,

I have an existing 240 volt outlet in my garage. Can I use it? There are many different types of 240 volt outlets. Tesla supports adapters for the most common outlets, I live in an apartment or condo. Can I still get Tesla home charging installed? Increasingly, condos and apartment buildings are required by law to allow EV charging.

Request your apartment or condo install EV charging Request for approval to self-install EV charging in your deeded parking space

Note: Always ensure you have approval before installing any charging hardware. Where can I find out more about incentives specific to home charging? Home charging related incentives can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy Alternative Fuels Data Center,

How many solar panels does it take to charge a Tesla?

Frequently asked questions about charging a Tesla with solar – Can you charge a Tesla with solar power? Yes, you can absolutely charge a Tesla with solar power! How many solar panels are required to charge a Tesla? It takes roughly eight to 10 solar panels to charge a Tesla.

  1. This is only an estimate though; in reality, the number of panels depends on several factors, such as the solar panel’s efficiency, the model Tesla being charged, and what the power output of the connection being used.
  2. How much energy does it take to charge a Tesla Model 3? For the average American driver who commutes 30 miles every day, it takes about 7.75 kWh of energy to charge a Tesla Model 3.
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How long would it take a solar energy system to charge a Tesla? Charging a Tesla using solar panels can take anywhere from eight hours to several days depending on the Tesla model, sun exposure, energy output, charger type, and how much charge the battery requires to reach 100 percent.

How long does it take to charge a Tesla at a supercharger?

The Tesla Supercharger is the fastest charging option when you’re away from home, allowing you to charge your car up to 200 miles in 15 minutes.

Can normal EV charge at Tesla station?

Tesla owners have exclusive access to a vast network of more than 1,600 Supercharger charging stations nationwide, which make topping up a Tesla convenient, seamless, and relatively quick. Owners of other EVs rely on a patchwork of chargers that aren’t always convenient to access, might not always charge rapidly, and require the user to fumble through an app or swipe a credit card to activate the charger.

Now, Tesla is making at least some of its charging network available to owners of non-Tesla EVs. In order to qualify for a slice of the $7.5 billion earmarked for EV charging network expansion in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, the company says it will open up 7,500 chargers from its Supercharger and Destination Charger network to non-Tesla vehicles by the end of 2024.

Of these, at least 3,500 will be new and existing fast 250-kilowatt (kW) Superchargers along highways; the rest will be slower Level 2 chargers located at businesses such as hotels and restaurants. Opening Superchargers to other cars and doubling the size of its nationwide charging network, as Tesla has pledged, should help address consumer concerns about access to chargers.

In a nationally representative survey of 8,027 U.S. adults conducted by CR in winter 2022 ( PDF ), the top two barriers reported among those who weren’t already planning to buy an EV were charging logistics (61 percent) and the number of miles the vehicle can go before needing a charge (55 percent). “This is a great step in accelerating charger availability,” says Chris Harto, CR’s senior policy analyst for transportation and energy.

“But as our experiences show, there is more work to be done in building out a robust network of chargers nationwide that EV drivers can depend on.” Tesla’s U.S. Superchargers use a proprietary charging plug. To enable non-Tesla EVs to use its chargers, the company has developed an adapter called the “Magic Dock,” which incorporates the popular Combined Charging System (CCS) charging standard into the existing Tesla plug.

  • It will work with nearly all EVs but the Nissan Leaf, which uses a different plug standard.
  • How well do Tesla’s Superchargers work with other EVs? Our testers visited two of the first Superchargers that were made available in our region to find out.
  • We also asked some Tesla drivers what they thought about having their once-proprietary network of chargers opened up to the EV masses.

Alex Knizek, an automotive engineer at Consumer Reports, tried out the Magic Dock Superchargers at two different locations, first with a Lucid Air and then, later that week at a different station, with a Kia EV6. I joined him at the second station with a Mercedes-Benz EQE.

  • To use a Supercharger, non-Tesla owners first need to download the Tesla App (version 4.18.0 or higher) for iOS or Android, create a profile, and add a payment method.
  • The app enables you to locate a charger that is available with the Magic Dock CCS adaptor.
  • Fortunately we already have an account set up to charge any Tesla in our test fleets.

Non-Tesla owners should remember that there aren’t many Superchargers equipped with the Magic Dock—at least not yet. We went to the two that were closest to our Auto Test Center in central Connecticut. The first one was in Ballston Spa, N.Y., about 170 miles away; the other was in Brewster, N.Y., roughly 80 miles from our track.

We needed to drive well out of the way to use a Supercharger with a Magic Dock because so few have been rolled out. Both locations were near highways, and neither was close to capacity during our visits. Charging a non-Tesla with a Supercharger is currently one of the most expensive fast charging options per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Of the currently available spots, they range from $0.48/kWh to $0.55. Most are $0.49/kWh, which is similar to Electrify America’s $0.48/kWh non-subscription price. They drop to $0.39/kWh with a $12.99 per month membership. Idle fees, which are charged if the car is left alone at the charger after being fully charged, are $1.00/minute. The combination of Tesla’s short charging cord and the non-standardized placement of charge ports on different EVs can cause headaches for the person charging (and potentially for others who want to use the Superchargers). Sometimes the process works smoothly, and other times there are unexplained hiccups. While Tesla Superchargers are DC fast chargers, the non-Tesla EVs charged at a slower rate than they are claimed to be capable of charging on a DC fast charger.

Location: Stewart’s Gas Station, Ballston Spa, N.Y. Distance from ATC: 170 miles Charging fee: $0.49/kWh Alex was the first CR staffer to try out the Magic Dock. He charged up our Lucid Air at a Supercharger located behind a Stewart’s Shops in Ballston Spa, N.Y., near Saratoga Springs.

  1. Stewart’s Shops is a New York-based chain of convenience stores and gas stations that usually has food, outdoor seating, bathrooms, and other comforts.) “It isn’t really a terrible spot to wait, in my opinion,” he said.
  2. Each charging station has a sign with a QR code on it, which takes users to a page that explains how to charge a non-Tesla.

And each station had a Magic Dock, so EV drivers could charge at any location. But the Supercharger’s short cord and the location of the Lucid’s charge port (between the driver’s door and front wheel) presented some challenges. “Initially I parked normally, just pulling up to the charger, but the cord did not reach at all,” Alex recounted.

  1. I got back in and inched the car forward, nearly touching the large bollard that was located in front of the charger to protect it.
  2. Having my dad there to tell me when to stop was the only way to get close enough.” Even then, the cord was so taut that he was concerned he would break the Lucid’s charge port.

He eventually performed a major charging faux pas by parking parallel to the charger and blocking access to two other chargers. (Fortunately, no other drivers in need of a charge pulled up while Alex was there.) Tesla acknowledges this on its FAQ, saying “Certain Supercharger site layouts may not be suitable for some cars.

  1. Please do not obstruct other cars by parking over the lines if the cable cannot comfortably reach your car.” After finally plugging in, the system worked without any hiccups.
  2. But it wasn’t nearly as fast as a Tesla could charge.
  3. I was limited to 49kW on all charge attempts, both with and without preconditioning the battery,” Alex said.

“I suspect this is a result of Lucid’s 900-volt charging system, which can only accept 50kW from older, legacy 400-volt charging networks.” Lucid claims that under ideal conditions, the Air can add 200 miles of range in about 12 minutes of charging. It would have taken well over an hour to add the same amount of range at that 49 kW rate.

Most current DC fast chargers are 800- to 1,000-volt systems, and are more compatible with the Lucid, while Tesla’s current Superchargers output around 500V. Although more super-high-voltage cars like the Lucid will come in the future, most EVs currently for sale and on the road are based on 400 volt systems and should charge at a similar rate on a Tesla Supercharger as they would on other charging networks.

Location: 1 Starr Ridge Road, Brewster, N.Y. Distance from ATC: 79 miles Charging fee: $0.49/kWh Located near the junction of Interstates 84 and 684, this Supercharger sat behind a small shopping center with a Dunkin’ and a Sherwin-Williams paint store.

There was only a gas station within walking distance, and drivers charging late at night could feel isolated, especially after the Dunkin’ closed. Our experience getting hooked up mirrored what Alex experienced with the Lucid Air. Both the EV6 and EQE have their charge ports on the passenger-side rear, and they’re fairly close to the back of the car.

But because the Supercharger cables are oriented on the right side of the charger and too short to reach the ports on the left side of the car, we had to park in the next space over rather than the one that corresponded to the charger. For example, to use charging station 1A you have to park in the space for station 1B—to the right of 1A—in order for the cable to reach.

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This effectively blocks 1B from being used by any Tesla, though a non-Tesla can potentially use it, by parking in space 1C. The EV6 Alex drove would not charge on the first station he hooked up to. There were no issues accessing the charge plug and connecting to the car. We heard a series of clicks and other noises as the charging station and the car’s onboard charger communicated.

The EV6 even made its standard “charging started” announcement. But within about 30 seconds a fault would appear on the app, and charging would stop. This happened a few times, so we moved the car to a different charging station, which worked flawlessly.

  1. The Mercedes-Benz I was driving also connected without any problem and began charging on the first attempt.
  2. We brought the EV6 because, like the Lucid, it uses a higher voltage electrical architecture that enables some of the fastest charging speeds available when connected to a 350kW charger (like those from Electrify America).

But we saw a max of 40kW when connected to the Supercharger. The EQE, which charges at a similar voltage to a Tesla, reached a rate of 76kW. These chargers are capable of charging a Tesla at a rate up to 250kW, which the automaker claims can add 75 miles of charge in 5 minutes and charge at rates of up to 1,000 miles per hour.

  • This would equate to giving our EQE about 16 miles of range for every 5 minutes of charging time or just over 190 miles in an hour.
  • Up until now, Tesla owners in the United States and Canada had access to a proprietary charging infrastructure that was sleek and seamless.
  • Owners can locate and drive to a Supercharger using the in-car navigation system.

Upon arrival and plugging in, the Tesla charging station communicates with the car and, if applicable, charges the owner’s account for the session. It is truly a plug-and-play system for Tesla owners. But now, the doors to this private club have been flung open.

  • Scotty Olson, an EV enthusiast from New Jersey, drove more than 180 miles round trip with his wife to try out the Magic Dock in Brewster, the closest to their home.
  • As the owner of both a Tesla Model 3 and a Volkswagen ID.4, he says he can see both advantages and disadvantages to the rollout of the Magic Docks.

“As an ID.4 owner, the Magic Dock makes the charging experience so much better,” Olson says. “It’s a great way to drive EV adoption. The number-one thing I hear from people considering an EV is worrying about where they are going to charge. It’s exciting that the biggest maker of chargers is opening up their chargers, and that excuse goes out the window.” Even though it took him two attempts to get a charging station to connect to his ID.4, Scotty said that his experience with Superchargers overall has been very good.

“If I pull up to an Electrify America station and they’re all working, I’m surprised. It seems as if one is always down. It’s pretty rare to find even one Tesla Supercharger that isn’t working even in a location with 12 stalls. I would choose a Magic Dock charger over Electrify America, EVgo, Chargepoint, and others because of the reliability factor.

” He was slightly less enthusiastic when wearing his Tesla-owner hat: “I’m not looking forward to non-Tesla owners taking up two spaces when they are trying to charge,” he said. As already noted, the Magic Dock charging speeds we experienced were not particularly fast, the short charging cables are an inconvenience and, for now at least, the nearest Magic Dock-equipped Supercharger may be more than a full charge away.

  1. However, if you need a charge and your route takes you past one of the Magic Docks, it’s now another option—one that’s well-maintained and in working order: According to a 2022 survey conducted by J.D.
  2. Power, both Tesla Destination chargers and Superchargers rank highest in terms of customer satisfaction.

The same can’t always be said for other public charging options. In the J.D. Power survey, of the respondents who didn’t charge their vehicle during a visit to a public charging station, 72 percent indicated it was because the station was out of service or malfunctioned.

And anecdotal evidence from CR staff members experiences using public chargers confirms this. “Almost every time at least one stall is broken or malfunctioning,” says Alex. “Or the charger handles are broken. It once took me 30 minutes in the back of a dark, snowy parking lot in Albany to get an EVgo charger to work.” CR auto technician Michael Crossen says he has had many similar experiences.

“I was in Auburn, Mass., at an Electrify America station, and it was 12 degrees out and snowing,” he says. “One charger was dark and not operational when I got there. I had to try three different chargers before one would connect to our ID.4.” And at a local EVgo charger, he was never able to get more than 30kW in a charging session with our Polestar 2, even though it was supposedly a 50kW charger.

How many kWh does it take to charge a Tesla Model 3?

Cost to charge a Tesla Model 3 – The Model 3 line includes compact sedans and is Tesla’s most affordable line of vehicles. It costs between 3.76 and 4.67 cents per mile to charge a Model 3 product, The Model 3 is Tesla’s cheapest product to charge.

Tesla Product Energy required to charge battery Cost to charge battery Range of distance Charging cost per mile
Model 3 RWD 70 kWh* $10.95 272 miles 4.03¢
Model 3 Long Range 86 kWh* $13.45 358 miles 3.76¢
Model 3 Performance 94 kWh** $14.70 315 miles 4.67¢

Based on model year 2022, the closest model listed by the EPA. **Based on model year 2021, the closest model listed by the EPA.

Can I charge my Tesla to 100?

If you really need the range, go up to 90-95%. Thou shalt not charge your Tesla to 100%, unless you absolutely must. Credit: Smith Collection/Gado / gettyimages Electric car batteries should not, generally, be charged to 100%. Long-term, this reduces the battery’s longevity, and Tesla cars actually charge up to 90% by default.

  • But if you’re pressed for range, should you change this and charge up to 100%? Well, unless you absolutely must squeeze every bit of range out of your battery, the answer is still no.
  • It’s not just about battery degradation.
  • In a recent Twitter exchange, Tesla CEO Elon Musk explained that regenerative braking does not kick in at full charge, meaning the car is less energy efficient.

A Tesla Model 3 owner asked Musk whether she should charge up to 100%, given her commute is a total of 160 miles, which leaves little wiggle room to do much else with the car without a recharge. Her Model 3 is the Standard Range Plus variety, which has 240 miles of range at full battery capacity, but this drops to about 216 miles at the default 90% charge setting.

Musk’s answer is that she should still charge to 90% or 95%, to reap the full benefit of regenerative braking. Tweet may have been deleted Regenerative braking is the tech that turns braking energy into electricity, extending the car’s range by re-felling the battery. Its effectiveness varies by a number of factors, but there are reports of it extending a Tesla’s range by as much as 30%.

So charging the battery to 95% might actually be almost as good, range-wise, as charging to 100%. To know exactly how close the numbers get, one would have to know when, exactly, regenerative braking kicks in. I’ve pinged Musk for the answer and will update the article if I get it, but anecdotal evidence from Tesla forums suggests that it happens when the battery is anywhere from 84% to 94% capacity, so roughly in line with what Musk had said – but ambient temperature is also a factor, so your mileage (literally) may vary. Stan is a Senior Editor at Mashable, where he has worked since 2007. He’s got more battery-powered gadgets and band t-shirts than you. He writes about the next groundbreaking thing. Typically, this is a phone, a coin, or a car. His ultimate goal is to know something about everything.