How Long Does It Take For Mirena To Stop Periods

22.08.2023 0 Comments

Why it’s done – Mirena offers effective, long-term contraception. It can be used in premenopausal women of all ages, including teenagers. Among various benefits, Mirena:

Eliminates the need to interrupt sex for contraception Doesn’t require partner participation Can remain in place for up to seven years Can be removed at any time, followed by a quick return to fertility Can be used while breast-feeding — although you may need to wait six to eight weeks after having a baby so that you don’t risk injuring the uterus during placement Doesn’t carry the risk of side effects related to birth control that contains estrogen

Mirena can decrease menstrual bleeding after three or more months of use. About 20 percent of women stop having periods after one year of using Mirena. Mirena can also decrease:

Severe menstrual pain and pain related to the growth of uterine-lining tissue outside the uterus (endometriosis) The risk of pelvic infection The risk of endometrial cancer

Because of these noncontraceptive benefits, Mirena is often prescribed for women with:

Heavy menstrual bleeding Cramping or pain with periods Endometriosis Unusual growth of the lining of the uterus (endometrial hyperplasia) Unusual growth of uterine-lining tissue into the muscular wall of the uterus (adenomyosis) Anemia Fibroids

Mirena isn’t appropriate for everyone. Your health care provider may discourage use of Mirena if you have:

Breast cancer, or have had it Uterine or cervical cancer Liver disease Uterine conditions, such as fibroids, that interfere with the placement or retention of Mirena A pelvic infection or current pelvic inflammatory disease Unexplained vaginal bleeding

Tell your health care provider if you:

Take any medications, including nonprescription and herbal products Have diabetes or high blood pressure Have a heart condition or have had a heart attack Have migraines Have blood-clotting problems or have had a stroke Recently gave birth or are breast-feeding

How long does it take to stop bleeding with Mirena?

Irregular bleeding and spotting is normal for the first few months after the IUD is placed. In some cases, women may experience irregular bleeding or spotting for up to six months after the IUD is placed. This bleeding can be annoying at first but usually will become lighter with the Mirena IUD quickly.

Does an IUD immediately stop your period?

Copper IUDs – Unlike a hormonal IUD, a copper IUD does not prevent ovulation, Copper IUDs work by preventing sperm from reaching and fertilizing an egg. In the unlikely event that fertilization does occur, the copper IUD prevents the egg from implanting into the endometrium.

bleeding between periods, or spottingcramping or aching in the lower backirregular periods

Side effects should resolve within 2–3 months of receiving the copper IUD. Learn more about the differences between these two types of IUDs here, Share on Pinterest A person may experience heavier than usual periods while adjusting to an IUD. With so many variables to account for, it is almost impossible to predict how an individual will respond to a particular IUD.

spotting irregular periodsheavier than usual periods

Why do I still get my period with the Mirena?

3. What if I do not have my period for a long time and then suddenly I have my period again? – Approximately half of women with a hormonal IUD will stop having their menstrual cycles. It is common for some women to have irregular, light menstruation with a hormonal IUD.

Do you bleed a lot with Mirena?

Treatment with Mirena® (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) 52mg Did you know that 1 in 3 women experience heavy periods? Mirena IUD prevents pregnancy for up to 8 years, and also treats heavy periods for up to 5 years in women who choose an IUD for birth control. In a clinical trial of Mirena in women with HMB, Mirena rapidly reduced heavy periods.The majority experienced: In some women with heavy bleeding, the total blood loss per cycle progressively decreases with continued use. The number of spotting and bleeding days may initially increase but then typically decrease in the months that follow. Bleeding may also continue to be irregular.

You may have bleeding and spotting between menstrual periods, especially during the first 3 to 6 months. Sometimes the bleeding is heavier than usual at first. However, the bleeding usually becomes lighter than usual and may be irregular. Call your healthcare provider if the bleeding remains heavier than usual or increases after it has been light for a while.

About 2 out of 10 women stop having periods after 1 year of Mirena use. If you have any concerns that you may be pregnant while using Mirena, do a urine pregnancy test and call your healthcare provider. If you do not have a period for 6 weeks during Mirena use, call your healthcare provider.

every month, the lining of the uterus thickens during the first half of your menstrual cycle to prepare for ovulationif ovulation takes place and the egg is not fertilized, the thickened uterine lining is shed as menstrual flowon average, a woman’s menstrual flow lasts 3 to 5 days. It may be shorter or longer, depending on the woman

A Mirena can reduce your heavy periods by thinning the lining of the uterus. In a clinical trial performed in women with heavy menstrual bleeding that were treated with Mirena, almost 9 out of 10 were treated successfully ― with their blood loss reduced by more than half after 6 months. Understand how Mirena works in the uterus. Choose questions to ask your healthcare provider. Get the lowdown on getting a Mirena IUD. : Treatment with Mirena® (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) 52mg

How can I stop bleeding with Mirena?

Common changes in menstrual bleeding – Most complaints about heavier or longer menses are best managed by reassurance. Heavier periods may be particularly noticeable for women changing from combined oral contraceptives and other hormonal methods that reduce menstrual bleeding.

  1. When reassurance is not sufficient, or the bleeding is especially heavy, a short course of ibuprofen during menses may reduce bleeding.
  2. A short course can be repeated in several months, but it is not desirable to use for an extended period.
  3. Iron tablets may be given to reduce chances of anemia.
  4. Both interventions help the provider be actively responsive to the woman’s concerns.

Many women adjust to having somewhat heavier menstruation, and the amount of bleeding usually becomes less over several months.

Can Mirena cause weight gain?

Common Mirena Side Effects – Mirena is a progesterone IUD that is considered a safe and effective form of birth control, however, it can cause side effects including cramps and mood swings. Compared to other hormonal birth control, the severity and risk of these side effects are relatively low.

Changes in menstruation: Many women choose Mirena because of its ability to lessen or eliminate period flow. During the first three to six months, periods may be lighter. Bleeding and spotting between periods, as well as missed periods (amenorrhea) may also occur. Heavy bleeding is rare. Tenderness and pain: Abdominal or pelvic pain, mild cramping, back pain, headaches and migraines may occur. More than 5% of women who used the Mirena IUD in clinical trials reported breast pain or tenderness. Skin Issues: Hormonal acne, itching, and rashes have all been reported. Changes in hair growth, including hair loss or gain, may also occur. Gastrointestinal issues: Bloating, nausea and vomiting are common, but typically do not last long. Changes in estrogen levels can also cause water retention, which can add to feeling bloated.

Copper IUDs don’t use hormones and are not linked to weight gain, but there have been suggestions that weight gain is a common side effect of Mirena. Because the Mirena device uses levonorgestrel, a progestin hormone, a small percentage of patients may experience weight gain, although this is typically less severe than with other contraceptives.

Is it normal to bleed heavy after 1 year of IUD?

An intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective, long lasting form of birth control. However, it can cause you to experience a heavier-than-typical period. IUDs are generally safe to use, but like other forms of birth control, you may experience some unwanted side effects.

Copper (ParaGard) IUDs: These are plastic devices wrapped in coiled copper. They only need to be replaced every 10 years and have a failure rate of about 0.8%. Hormonal IUDs : These include Mirena, Skyla, Kyleena, and Liletta. They contain the hormone progestin and must be replaced every 3 to 8 years. They have a failure rate of about 0.1-0.4%.

Copper IUDs release a small number of copper ions into the tissue of your uterus, which creates an inflammatory response. This response makes the environment less welcoming to the egg and sperm. Copper is also toxic to sperm, so if any do reach the egg, they will likely be unable to fertilize successfully.

  1. Hormonal IUDs work similarly, but they use progesterone to prevent fertilization.
  2. While they can cause abnormal bleeding for about 3-6 months following implantation, you will likely experience lighter periods after this transition period.
  3. IUDs do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

You may still want to use condoms with new sexual partners and get regular testing for STIs to help prevent infections. Learn more about choosing the right IUD, The cost of an IUD can vary from $0 dollars out of pocket to around $1,000, according to the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC).

If you have health insurance, the Affordable Care Act requires the insurance company to cover the full cost. They cannot charge you copays or other expenses related to birth control as long as you go through an in-network provider. The NWLC warns, however, that while they need to cover both copper and hormone IUDs, they do not need to cover every type.

While you may be able to use any option available with no issues, you may run into an issue if a doctor recommends you use a type your insurance does not cover. If your insurance does not cover the specific type of IUD you need, or you do not have insurance, a local health clinic may be able to provide a lower-cost option.

discomfort during or shortly following placementexpulsion of the IUDcrampingheavier or longer than typical periodspassing blood clots with an IUD

More specific side effects vary depending on the type of IUD. Copper IUDs often cause heavy bleeding. They can also cause an increase in cramping and backaches during monthly periods in some people. These side effects are not unusual or necessarily a reason for concern.

In a 2018 study, researchers noted that heavy bleeding within the first year following implantation represented a primary cause of discontinuation of the device. They also found in their study that heavy menstrual bleeding before insertion puts a person at a higher risk of discontinuation within a year.

Your period with IUD after 1 year may return to typical levels. But you may continue to experience heavy or irregular bleeding after a year with a copper IUD. Hormonal IUDs typically have the opposite effect. Periods often become lighter and less painful or may go away entirely.

How can I stop my period once started?

How to stop your period – It’s best to talk to your gynecologist about ways to stop your period, “The success rate will be very different based on when you try in your cycle and what method you use,” says Dr. Jhaveri. If you know there’s an important event coming up in the next few months, the earlier you can game plan with your doctor the better, says Dr.

Why won’t I stop bleeding on Mirena?

Is Spotting With Mirena Normal? – Some people fear that Mirena won’t help early on, as they notice that they have more spotting rather than less. It’s important to point out that more days of spotting or irregular bleeding is normal after Mirena has been inserted. It usually decreases after a few months of use.

Are periods shorter with Mirena?

One major potential selling point of hormonal IUDs is their ability to sometimes make periods lighter and shorter. For about 1 in 5 people using the Mirena or LILETTA IUDs, periods stop altogether after a year. But is it just random chance as to whether your period stops or not? New research from the massive CHOICE study shows that there are some factors that make you more or less likely to stop bleeding with a hormonal IUD.

Do periods go back to normal after Mirena?

What to do and look for at home –

You may have some cramping or a small amount of vaginal bleeding that may last several hours to several days after the IUD removal. You may use a sanitary pad or a tampon if you need to until the bleeding stops. It can take up to 3 months after the IUD removal for your normal menstrual cycle (period) to return. After removal of your IUD, you no longer have birth control. It is important to talk to your health care provider about another method of birth control if you do not wish to become pregnant.

Can I use a tampon with Mirena?

Yes, you can use a tampon if you have an IUD (intrauterine device). When the IUD is placed, it is guided through your vagina and cervix and then into the uterus. The IUD stays in the uterus—not in the vagina, where a tampon is used. See Long-Acting Reversible Contraception to learn more about the IUD.

  1. Published: October 2020 Last reviewed: October 2020 Copyright 2023 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
  2. All rights reserved.
  3. Read copyright and permissions information,
  4. This information is designed as an educational aid for the public.
  5. It offers current information and opinions related to women’s health.

It is not intended as a statement of the standard of care. It does not explain all of the proper treatments or methods of care. It is not a substitute for the advice of a physician. Read ACOG’s complete disclaimer,

How often do you bleed with Mirena?

FAQs About Mirena® IUD is a small, T-shaped device that’s placed in your uterus by your healthcare provider to prevent pregnancy. Getting an IUD does not involve surgery, but instead, can be placed during a routine in-office visit or immediately after giving birth.

  1. Once in place, it provides continuous, highly effective birth control.
  2. You may experience pain, bleeding, or dizziness during and after placement.
  3. If your symptoms do not pass within 30 minutes after placement, Mirena may not have been placed correctly.
  4. Your healthcare provider will examine you to see if Mirena needs to be removed or replaced.
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You may experience pain, bleeding, or dizziness during and after placement. If your symptoms do not pass within 30 minutes after placement, Mirena may not have been placed correctly. Your healthcare provider will examine you to see if Mirena needs to be removed or replaced.

  1. If pain is a concern for you, ask your healthcare provider about taking over-the-counter pain medication before the procedure. No.
  2. At any time by your healthcare provider.
  3. You could become pregnant as soon as Mirena is removed, so you should use another method of birth control if you do not want to become pregnant.

Mirena is not right for everyone. Do not use Mirena if you:

are or might be pregnant; Mirena cannot be used as an emergency contraceptive have had a serious pelvic infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), unless you have had a normal pregnancy after the infection went away have an untreated pelvic infection now have had a serious pelvic infection in the past 3 months after a pregnancy can get infections easily. For example, if you:

have multiple sexual partners or your partner has multiple sexual partners have problems with your immune system use or abuse intravenous drugs

have or suspect you might have cancer of the uterus or cervix have bleeding from the vagina that has not been explained have liver disease or a liver tumor have breast cancer or any other cancer that is sensitive to progestin (a female hormone), now or in the past have an intrauterine device in your uterus already have a condition of the uterus that changes the shape of the uterine cavity, such as large fibroid tumors are allergic to levonorgestrel, silicone, polyethylene, silica, barium sulfate or iron oxide

Mirena can cause serious side effects, including:

Ectopic pregnancy and intrauterine pregnancy risks. There are risks if you become pregnant while using Mirena (see “”). Life‐threatening infection. Life­‐threatening infection can occur within the first few days after Mirena is placed. Call your healthcare provider immediately if you develop severe pain or fever shortly after Mirena is placed. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Some IUD users get a serious pelvic infection called pelvic inflammatory disease. PID is usually sexually transmitted. You have a higher chance of getting PID if you or your partner has sex with other partners. PID can cause serious problems such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy or pelvic pain that does not go away. PID is usually treated with antibiotics. More serious cases of PID may require surgery including removal of the uterus (hysterectomy). In rare cases, infections that start as PID can even cause death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these signs of PID: long-lasting or heavy bleeding, unusual vaginal discharge, low abdominal (stomach area) pain, painful sex, chills, fever, genital lesions or sores. Perforation. Mirena may go into the wall of the uterus (become embedded) or go through the wall of the uterus. This is called perforation. If this occurs, Mirena may no longer prevent pregnancy. If perforation occurs, Mirena may move outside the uterus and can cause internal scarring, infection, or damage to other organs, and you may need surgery to have Mirena removed. Excessive pain or vaginal bleeding during placement of Mirena, pain or bleeding that gets worse after placement, or not being able to feel the threads may happen with perforation. The risk of perforation is increased if Mirena is inserted while you are breastfeeding, or if you have recently given birth. Expulsion. Mirena may come out by itself. This is called expulsion. Excessive pain or vaginal bleeding during placement of Mirena, pain or bleeding that gets worse after placement, or not being able to feel the threads may happen with expulsion. You may become pregnant if Mirena comes out. If you think that Mirena has come out, avoid intercourse or use a non-hormonal back-up birth control (such as condoms or spermicide) and call your healthcare provider. The risk of expulsion is increased with insertion right after delivery or second-trimester abortion.

Common side effects of Mirena include:

Pain, bleeding, or dizziness during and after placement. If these symptoms do not stop 30 minutes after placement, Mirena may not have been placed correctly. Your healthcare provider will examine you to see if Mirena needs to be removed or replaced. Changes in bleeding. You may have bleeding and spotting between menstrual periods, especially during the first 3 to 6 months. Sometimes the bleeding is heavier than usual at first. However, the bleeding usually becomes lighter than usual and may be irregular. Call your healthcare provider if the bleeding remains heavier than usual or increases after it has been light for a while. Missed menstrual periods. About 2 out of 10 women stop having periods after 1 year of Mirena use. If you have any concerns that you may be pregnant while using Mirena, do a urine pregnancy test and call your healthcare provider. If you do not have a period for 6 weeks during Mirena use, call your healthcare provider. When Mirena is removed, your menstrual periods should return. Cysts on the ovary. Some women using Mirena develop a painful cyst on the ovary. These cysts usually disappear on their own in 2 to 3 months. However, cysts can cause pain and sometimes cysts will need surgery.

Other common side effects include:

abdominal or pelvic pain inflammation or infection of the outer part of your vagina (vulvovaginitis) headache or migraine vaginal discharge

These are not all of the possible side effects with Mirena. For more information, ask your healthcare provider. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at, You may also report side effects to Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals at,

For the first 3 to 6 months, your period may become irregular and the number of bleeding days may increase. You may also have frequent spotting or light bleeding, and some women have heavy bleeding during this time. You may also have cramping during the first few weeks. After you have used Mirena for a while, the number of bleeding and spotting days is likely to lessen.

For some women, periods will stop altogether. When Mirena is removed, your menstrual periods should return. In some women with heavy bleeding, the total blood loss per cycle progressively decreases with continued use. The number of spotting and bleeding days may initially increase but then typically decreases in the months that follow.

  1. Mirena does not protect against HIV infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  2. Yes, tampons or menstrual cups may be used with Mirena.
  3. Change tampons or menstrual cups with care to avoid pulling the threads of Mirena.
  4. If you think you may have pulled Mirena out of place, avoid intercourse or use a non-hormonal back-up birth control (such as condoms or spermicide), and contact your healthcare provider.

You and your partner should not feel Mirena during intercourse. Mirena is placed in the uterus, not in the vagina. Sometimes your partner may feel the threads. If this occurs, or if you or your partner experience pain during sex, talk with your healthcare provider.

It depends on whether you were using hormonal birth control prior to getting Mirena and also when Mirena is placed during your menstrual cycle. Your healthcare provider will confirm if you need to use back-up birth control after Mirena is placed. Yes, you should check that Mirena is in the proper position by feeling the removal threads.

It is a good habit to do this 1 time a month. Your healthcare provider should teach you how to check that Mirena is in place. First, wash your hands with soap and water. You can check by reaching up to the top of your vagina with clean fingers to feel the removal threads.

Do not pull on the threads. If you feel more than just the threads or if you cannot feel the threads, Mirena may not be in the right position and may not prevent pregnancy. Avoid intercourse or use non-hormonal back-up birth control (such as condoms or spermicide) and ask your healthcare provider to check that Mirena is still in the right place.

Call your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns (see ). Otherwise, you should return to your healthcare provider for a follow-up visit 4 to 6 weeks after Mirena is placed to make sure that Mirena is in the right position. Mirena must be removed after 8 years.

  • However, your healthcare provider can place a new Mirena during the same office visit if you choose to continue using Mirena.
  • For continued treatment of heavy menstrual flow after 5 years, your healthcare provider can remove Mirena and place a new Mirena during the same office visit. Yes.
  • The Mirena IUD that you have is the same IUD that is now approved to prevent pregnancy for up to 8 years.

However, it is important to be sure of your timeline. Reach out to your HCP and confirm the date of placement to ensure that you are using Mirena for an appropriate amount of time. Your healthcare provider can remove Mirena at any time. You may become pregnant as soon as Mirena is removed.

  • About 8 out of 10 women who want to become pregnant will become pregnant sometime in the first year after Mirena is removed.
  • Call your healthcare provider right away if you think you may be pregnant.
  • If possible, also do a urine pregnancy test.
  • If you get pregnant while using Mirena, you may have an ectopic pregnancy.

This means that the pregnancy is not in the uterus. Unusual vaginal bleeding or abdominal pain especially with missed periods may be a sign of ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is a medical emergency that often requires surgery. Ectopic pregnancy can cause internal bleeding, infertility, and even death.

There are also risks if you get pregnant while using Mirena and the pregnancy is in the uterus. Severe infection, miscarriage, premature delivery, and even death can occur with pregnancies that continue with an intrauterine device (IUD). Because of this, your healthcare provider may try to remove Mirena, even though removing it may cause a miscarriage.

If Mirena cannot be removed, talk with your healthcare provider about the benefits and risks of continuing the pregnancy and possible effects of the hormone on your unborn baby. If you continue your pregnancy, see your healthcare provider regularly. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get flu-like symptoms, fever, chills, cramping, pain, bleeding, vaginal discharge, or fluid leaking from your vagina.

These may be signs of infection. You may use Mirena when you are breastfeeding. Mirena is not likely to affect the quality or amount of your breast milk or the health of your nursing baby. However, isolated cases of decreased milk production have been reported. The risk of Mirena going into the wall of the uterus (becoming embedded) or going through the wall of the uterus is increased if Mirena is inserted while you are breastfeeding.

: FAQs About Mirena® IUD

What was your first period like after Mirena insertion?

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission Here’s our process, Healthline only shows you brands and products that we stand behind. Our team thoroughly researches and evaluates the recommendations we make on our site. To establish that the product manufacturers addressed safety and efficacy standards, we:

Evaluate ingredients and composition: Do they have the potential to cause harm? Fact-check all health claims: Do they align with the current body of scientific evidence? Assess the brand: Does it operate with integrity and adhere to industry best practices?

We do the research so you can find trusted products for your health and wellness. How IUDs affect your period can depend on the type of IUD you get. Some people stop getting their period while others may have a lighter flow. A few things about IUDs — those flexible, T-shaped birth control devices — are certain.

For one thing, they’re about 99 percent effective at preventing pregnancy. They’re also supposed to make your periods lighter. Some people will find that their monthly flow becomes a thing of the past. But everyone’s experience — and subsequent bleeding — is totally different. There are so many possible variables that it’s impossible to predict exactly how your body will respond.

Here’s what you should know. Will the IUD spare you from having monthly periods? Your odds of having to continue buying pads or tampons may depend on how heavy your pre-IUD periods were. Researchers in one 2016 study looked at more than 1,800 people who used the Mirena IUD,

  • After a year, those who’d started out with light or short periods were more likely to stop bleeding altogether.
  • While 21 percent of participants with light periods reported that their menstrual flow stopped, only 5 percent of those with heavy periods had the same results.
  • There are four hormonal IUDs — Mirena, Kyleena, Liletta, and Skyla — and one copper IUD — ParaGard.

Hormonal IUDs may make your periods lighter. Some people don’t get periods at all while on them. Copper IUDs often make periods heavier and crampier. However, this may not be a permanent change. Your period may return to its usual state after about six months.

How do you know if Mirena is working?

Change in character of periods – When the Mirena coil is in place it generally results in lighter periods or no periods at all, as explained above. If, suddenly, “proper” periods occur after a period of experiencing lighter or no periods, this means that the womb lining has been allowed to thicken normally and shed to produce menstrual bleeding.

This could indicate Mirena failure, because the levonorgestrel is not having the desired effect. However, during the first 3-6 months of having the Mirena inserted, irregular periods (frequent, heavy periods alternating with infrequent, light periods) are common, and does not necessarily mean the coil is not working — it is simply because the body is adjusting to the effect of the Mirena.

One suggestion is that the imbalance in the body between progesterone and oestrogen caused when the Mirena is inserted causes the womb lining to be fragile, and therefore more likely to bleed and cause irregular bleeding. If there is a sudden change in the bleeding pattern, particularly heavy periods, it is worth getting this investigated as it may be due to other causes such as infection or expulsion of the Mirena.

Does ibuprofen stop Mirena bleeding?

Discussion – Contrary to most of previous studies, which investigated the clinical effect of NSAIDs in treating Cu-IUDs associated heavy menstrual bleeding; the current study is the first one that investigated the effect of ibuprofen treatment on MBL pattern and uterine blood flow in women complaining of heavy bleeding with Cu-IUDs.

  1. The present work demonstrates that ibuprofen was effective regarding the outcomes of uterine bleeding profile with Cu- IUDs.
  2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ibuprofen treatment reduced the uterine volume and blood flow to and inside the uterus after 3 months of use, a change that could have been the cause of the effect of the treatment.

Heavy menstrual bleeding is reported by a considerable number of new Cu-IUDs users that can result in iron deficiency anemia, One of the most accepted mechanisms in explaining this phenomenon is that Cu-IUD has been associated with an increase in the prostaglandin production which subsequently can cause an increase in the menstrual bleeding,

  1. The implication of using ibuprofen was based on its ability to decrease prostaglandin production within the endometrium, an effect that leads to decrease the uterine bleeding with Cu-IUDs,
  2. The NSAIDs are the most commonly tested medications for treatment of heavy bleeding with Cu-IUDs; not only for controlling the current bleeding attack but also as prophylactic against the uterine bleeding,
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In the current study, we confirmed that ibuprofen is effective in reducing the amount of blood loss in the women complaining of heavy bleeding after Cu-IUDs insertion as 80% of them achieved a satisfactory response after 3 months. Similar to our finding, a Cochrane systematic review included 15 randomized controlled trials with more than 2700 women found that NSAIDs should be considered the first line for reducing bleeding associated with IUD insertion,

  • Most of previous studies relied on quantitative methods for assessment of MBL as alkaline hematin method and pictorial blood loss assessment chart,
  • However; we used the menstrual diary, an easy method for assessment of MBL, to evaluate the uterine bleeding.
  • The nature of our patients may be behind this because they need a simplified tool to understand the evaluation method.

In our study, ibuprofen was effective in decreasing the uterine volume after 3 months of treatment. We are in the same track with the previous studies that proved a significant decrease in the mean uterine volume may lead to obvious improvement of uterine bleeding as well as the pain associated with IUD,

Many studies investigated the uterine blood flow in women using Cu-IUD and showed that those who developed heavy bleeding might be due to decrease vascular resistance in the uterine artery, therefore they reported decreased Doppler indices in those women, What is new in this study that we evaluated the intramyometrial blood vessels Doppler indices beside both uterine arteries, which was not studied.

We considered the changes in these small blood vessels which penetrate deeply into the myometrium to perfuse it, as another marker for the effectiveness of ibuprofen. Our results revealed a significant decrease in the uterine arteries and intramyometrial blood flow in patients received ibuprofen for 3 months.

Reduction in the uterine volume and decrease in the blood flow to and inside the uterus may stand behind the observed clinical improvement. As mentioned before, 80.5% of our participants responded well to ibuprofen, on the other hand; 19.5% of women did not respond to treatment. However; the researchers could not find an accepted explanation to those who did not respond to NSAIDs.

For this reason; we examined the value of baseline clinical and ultrasonographic criteria of the studied women in predicting the responsiveness to ibuprofen at 3 months follow up visit. We found that more of bleeding days, higher uterine volume and lower uterine artery PI are independently associated with poor response to ibuprofen in patients suffering from Cu- IUD associated heavy bleeding.

Uterine volume as a predictor for the effectiveness of levonorgestrel releasing IUD in controlling bleeding and pain with adenomyosis was studied before in a recent study, Our results were in agreement with this study which proved that failure of the treatment was associated significantly with a large volume uterus.

Additionally; Hurskainen et al. investigated the relation between PI and menorrhagia and found that women with lower uterine flow resistance bleed more, The strengths of our study include that it was a prospective cohort study with calculated sample size for achieving sufficient power to detect a clinically significant difference in our primary outcome.

  • The studying of ibuprofen effect on uterine blood flow in women complaining of heavy bleeding with Cu-IUDs and identification of potential predictors for responsiveness to ibuprofen had not studied before.
  • In conclusion, Ibuprofen can effectively control the blood loss associated with Cu-IUDs.
  • The decrease in uterine volume and the increase in uterine blood flow resistance may be behind the treatment effect.

However; the fewer bleeding days, smaller uterine volume, higher uterine artery PI could satisfactory predict ibuprofen effect on controlling heavy menstrual bleeding with Cu-IUDs.

How long does it take for Mirena to start working?

Mirena IUD in Bradenton, FL | Birth Control in South Bradenton, FL The Mirena IUD (Intrauterine Device) is a small T-shaped device placed into the uterus by a trained medical professional. The placement of Mirena is non-surgical, can be done in the office and takes only a few minutes. The Mirena is placed in the uterus so neither you or your partner should be able to feel the device during intercourse. Mirena is an IUD that release small amounts of a progestin hormone called levonorgestrel into the uterus. This hormone thickens the cervicl mucus to prevent sperm from entering your uterus, thereby inhibiting it from reaching or fertilizing the egg. See more children in your future but aren’t ready yet? Or maybe your family is just the right size but you’re not ready for permanent birth control. Either way, Mirena might be right for you if you want birth control that is:

Highly effective — One of the most effective birth control methods—over 99% at preventing pregnancy Low-maintenance — No daily pills and no monthly refills. It lasts as long as you want, for up to 5 years. The timeframe is up to you. You should do a monthly thread check to make sure it’s in place. Ask your healthcare provider to explain how. You should schedule a follow-up visit 4 to 6 weeks after your Mirena is placed to check that it’s in the right position Reversible — You can have it removed by your healthcare provider at any time, and try to become pregnant right away Estrogen-free — It delivers small amounts of progestin locally into your uterus

Approved to treat heavy periods—Mirena is the first and only IUD (intrauterine device) birth control that is FDA-approved to treat heavy periods in women who choose intrauterine birth control No birth control is right for everyone, so talk to your healthcare provider! They can help you decide if Mirena is the right choice for you.

  • There is a very slight risk of getting pregnant, less than 1 percent.
  • This is still the lowest risk of pregnancy of any form of birth control.
  • If you do conceive while using Mirena, you’re at a higher risk of an ectopic pregnancy, when the fertilized egg implants outside the uterus.
  • Still, because Mirena prevents most pregnancies, the risk of having an ectopic pregnancy is far lower than women who are not using contraception.

There is a slight risk that the insertion of Mirena causes perforation of the uterus. Typical side effects associated with Mirena include:

Headache Acne Breast tenderness Irregular bleeding (this usually improves after the first six months of use) Mood changes Cramping or pelvic pain

There is a chance of expelling Mirena from your uterus. This is more typical if Mirena was inserted immediately after childbirth. Most women have some degree of fear and trepidation about having an IUD inserted. After all, it must be painful to have something inserted through your cervix and into your uterus, right? Not necessarily. Our Premier OB/GYN patients find the pain tolerable and feel the tradeoff is well worth it for having this highly effective method of birth control in place. Once inserted, there’s nothing you need to do with Mirena, and it can stay in place for up to 5 years.

  1. If you had Mirena inserted within 7 days after the start of your period, it is effective immediately.
  2. If it is inserted at any other time during your menstrual cycle, Mirena will start working 7 days after it is inserted.
  3. So, for that first week after insertion, you need to use condoms or continue your pills, patch, or other birth control as a backup.

After we insert Mirena, you must not have sex or use tampons for 24 hours. Also, don’t use a hot tub, take a bath, or use a swimming pool. You may have some on and off cramping for 24 hours, so you may want to take it easy. This isn’t a requirement, however.

  • Do not pull on the strings, as this can dislodge Mirena.
  • The strings are only there to assure you the IUD is in place.
  • Women can only feel Mirena if it has descended and they are feeling the hard plastic.
  • You can feel the strings that descend out of the cervix, but that is only if you try and feel them.

At, we feel Mirena and other IUDs have some serious advantages over other forms of birth control. They are truly low-maintenance — No daily pills to take; no patches to replace; no condoms or diaphragms to put on or insert. Once placed by your Premier OB/GYN doctor, your Mirena IUD won’t need any attention.

Eliminates the need to interrupt sex for contraception Doesn’t require partner participation Can remain in place for 5 years Can be removed at any time, which will return you to fertility very quickly Can be used while breastfeeding Doesn’t carry the risk of side effects related to birth control methods containing estrogen Typically decreases menstrual bleeding at three or four months after placement About one-fifth of women stop having periods after one year of using Mirena Can decrease menstrual pain and pain associated with endometriosis Decreases risk of pelvic infection Decreases risk of endometrial cancer

About 5 percent of women on Mirena gain weight, but this varies widely between different women. The weight gain isn’t an increase in body fat. Instead, progestin, the hormone used in Mirena, can make your body hold onto more water and cause some bloating.

Does Mirena cause depression?

Uncommon side effects – These unwanted effects occurred in fewer than 5% of study participants over a 5-year period:

hair lossexcessive hair growthnauseapelvic infections, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

PID may be a more common complication in people with other risk factors for the disease. For example, it may be more likely to develop in someone with a sexually transmitted infection (STI), Some people report weight gain while using the Mirena IUD. However, most studies have not found a conclusive link between hormonal IUDs, such as Mirena, and weight gain.

A 2020 study comparing hormonal IUDs to another form of progesterone-only contraception, the injection, reported that participants using the injection gained weight while those with the IUD did not. Another 2020 study found different results. In a diverse cohort of women, the researchers investigated the effects of the hormonal IUD, the copper IUD, and the birth control implant on weight gain.

After 36 months, hormonal IUD users gained 0.72 kilograms (kg) on average. After 60 months, this figure rose to 1.52 kg — twice the amount that participants using the copper IUD had gained. This may indicate that the synthetic hormone in the Mirena IUD leads to a slight gain in weight.

  • However, many factors can influence weight gain, including age.
  • The study’s finding does not necessarily prove that the IUD causes a person to gain weight.
  • Some people experience mood changes while using hormonal contraception.
  • Data suggest that around 6.4% of people who use the Mirena IUD experience low mood or depression within 5 years.

However, it is also worth noting that some people use hormonal contraception to manage mood changes caused by conditions such as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), For people who experience significant mood changes due to hormonal fluctuations, a long-acting contraceptive such as the Mirena IUD may have a stabilizing effect.

a severe allergic reactiondevice expulsionmalpositioningperforation of the uterus severe pelvic painsepsis

All of these are serious issues that require immediate medical attention. For example, if the IUD perforates, or pierces, the uterus, the person usually needs surgery to retrieve the device. If the IUD does perforate the uterus, it no longer works to prevent pregnancy, so the person may need a different method of birth control.

ectopic pregnancy pregnancy loss, also called miscarriage premature labor

Anyone using this IUD who suspects that they are pregnant should speak with a doctor immediately. In many cases, unwanted effects of the Mirena IUD are not long-term. According to Planned Parenthood, common side effects such as spotting between periods and cramping typically get better in 3–6 months,

Meanwhile, a person might want to have some side effects of Mirena, such as lighter periods or none at all. Research suggests that these are usually long-term changes for people who experience them while using the IUD. Serious complications, such as PID, typically develop shortly after the person starts using the IUD — often within the first month.

These issues are uncommon. Speak with a doctor about any severe or persistent symptoms that occur during Mirena IUD use. The Mirena IUD releases the hormone levonorgestrel, a synthetic form of progesterone. Levonorgestrel works by thickening the cervical mucus and thinning the lining of the uterus, which prevents pregnancy from taking place.

Is highly effective: Mirena is more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. In one trial of 1,169 people aged 18–35, the 5-year pregnancy rate was 0.7%. In 12 months, only 0.2% of the participants became pregnant. Can work immediately: If a doctor inserts the device within 7 days of the start of a period, it begins working immediately. If a person gets their IUD outside of this time frame, it can take 7 days to start working. Long-acting and reversible: The Mirena IUD works for longer than almost any other contraceptive. A person does not have to remember to take pills or change patches. Can have other benefits: A person may appreciate some side effects of the Mirena IUD. For example, people with heavy periods, PMS, or PMDD may find that it helps manage their symptoms.

However, there are some disadvantages, such as the:

insertion procedure, which can be painfulpossibility of unwanted effectssmall risk of infection and other complicationssymptoms that may occur after the IUD is removed

It can take some time after a doctor removes the Mirena IUD for periods to return to normal. Also, some people experience a ” Mirena crash,” which involves changes to their mood, sleep, weight, and skin health. However, scientists have not studied this phenomenon.

the progesterone-only pill, also called the mini-pill the Depo-Provera injection the birth control implant

As a result, all of these contraceptives can cause similar side effects. The Mirena IUD can last for 5 years, so it may be a more convenient option than taking a daily mini-pill or getting periodic injections.

Can Mirena cause anxiety?

Updated 23 April 2020 | Published 11 November 2019 Fact Checked Flo Fact-Checking Standards Every piece of content at Flo Health adheres to the highest editorial standards for language, style, and medical accuracy. To learn what we do to deliver the best health and lifestyle insights to you, check out our content review principles,

Hormonal intrauterine devices, or IUDs, are a common form of hormonal birth control that have been used for decades. However, the synthetic progestin hormone that the IUD emits, levonorgestrel, may cause mood swings and other mental health changes for some women. Some women have reported being concerned about anxiety or depression as a side effect of their IUD.

Read on to find out if you need to consult with your doctor about mental health side effects of your IUD.

Does Mirena cause hair loss?

Overview Suddenly finding clumps of hair in the shower can be quite a shock, and figuring out the cause can be difficult. If you’ve recently had a Mirena intrauterine device ( IUD ) inserted, you might have heard that it could cause hair loss. Mirena is an intrauterine device system that contains and releases a progesterone-like hormone.

It does not contain estrogen. Mirena is one of the most commonly used forms of long-term birth control, but doctors don’t usually warn people of the possibility of hair loss. Is it true? Read on to find out. The product label for Mirena lists alopecia as one of the side effects reported in less than 5 percent of women who received the IUD during clinical trials.

Alopecia is the clinical term for hair loss. While hair loss isn’t very common in Mirena users, the number of women who reported hair loss during clinical trials was noteworthy enough to list it as a relevant adverse reaction on the product’s label. Following Mirena’s approval, there have only been a few studies done to find out if Mirena is related to hair loss.

One large Finnish study of women using an IUD containing levonorgestrel, like Mirena, noted hair loss rates of nearly 16 percent of participants. This study surveyed women who had a Mirena IUD inserted between April 1990 and December 1993. However, the study didn’t rule out other possible reasons for their hair loss.

A later review of post-marketing data in New Zealand found that hair loss was reported in less than 1 percent of Mirena users, which is in line with the Mirena product label. In 4 out of 5 of these cases, the timeframe in which hair loss occurred was known and started within 10 months of IUD insertion.

  1. Since other possible causes of hair loss were ruled out in some of these women, the researchers believe there’s reasonably strong evidence to suggest that the IUD caused their hair loss.
  2. The researchers also noted how the reduction in estrogen production and activity in menopause can cause associated hair loss by causing testosterone, which then becomes activated to a more active form called dihydrotestosterone, to have a higher bioavailability within the body and leads to hair loss.
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Though the exact reason why Mirena may cause hair loss isn’t known, the researchers hypothesized that, for some women, hair loss may result from a lower level of estrogen occurring in the body related to exposure to the progesterone-like hormone in Mirena.

aginggeneticsthyroid problems, including hypothyroidism malnutrition, including lack of sufficient protein or irontrauma or prolonged stress other medications, such as chemotherapy, some blood thinners, and certain antidepressantsillness or recent surgeryhormonal changes from childbirth or menopause diseases such as alopecia areataweight lossuse of chemical straighteners, hair relaxers, coloring, bleaching, or perming your hairusing ponytail holders or hair clips that are too tight or a hairstyle that pulls on the hair such as cornrows or braidsoveruse of heat styling tools for your hair, such as hair dryers, curling irons, hot curlers, or flat irons

It’s typical to lose your hair after you give birth. If you’ve had Mirena inserted after having a baby, your hair loss can most likely be attributed to postpartum hair loss, Mirena is a contraceptive IUD that contains a synthetic hormone called levonorgestrel.

dizziness, faintness, bleeding, or cramping during placementspotting, irregular bleeding or heavy bleeding, especially during the first three to six months absence of your period ovarian cysts abdominal or pelvic painvaginal dischargenauseaheadachenervousnesspainful menstruationvulvovaginitisweight gainbreast or back painacnedecreased libidodepressionhigh blood pressure

In rare cases, Mirena may also raise one’s risk for a serious infection known as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or another possibly life-threatening infection, During insertion, there’s also a risk of perforation or penetration of your uterine wall or cervix.

Another potential concern is a condition called embedment. This is when the device attaches inside of the wall of your uterus. In both of these cases, the IUD may need to be surgically removed. If you’ve noticed hair loss, it’s important that you visit a doctor to find out if there’s any other possible explanation.

Your doctor will likely check for vitamin and mineral deficiencies and assess your thyroid function. While it may be difficult to prove that Mirena is the cause of your hair loss, if your doctor can’t find another explanation, you may wish to have the IUD removed.

eating a well-balanced diet with plenty of proteintreating any nutritional deficiencies, especially of vitamins B-7 (biotin) and B complex, zinc, iron, and vitamins C, E, and Alightly massaging your scalp to promote circulationtaking good care of your hair and avoiding pulling, twisting, or harsh brushingavoiding heat styling, excessive bleaching, and chemical treatments on your hair

It can take months before you even begin to notice regrowth, so you’ll have to be patient. You can try a wig or hair extensions to help cover up the area in the meantime. Don’t hesitate to seek emotional support, including therapy or counseling, if you’re having a hard time coping with the hair loss.

  • Hair loss is considered a less common side effect of Mirena.
  • If you and your doctor decide that Mirena is the best choice for birth control, you most likely won’t have issues with hair loss, but it’s still something you should discuss with your doctor before the insertion.
  • If you think Mirena is responsible for your hair loss, seek a doctor’s opinion to rule out other potential causes.

Along with your doctor, you can make the decision to have Mirena removed and try a different type of birth control. Once Mirena is removed, be patient. It may take several months to notice any regrowth.

How long does it take for Mirena to start working?

Mirena IUD in Bradenton, FL | Birth Control in South Bradenton, FL The Mirena IUD (Intrauterine Device) is a small T-shaped device placed into the uterus by a trained medical professional. The placement of Mirena is non-surgical, can be done in the office and takes only a few minutes. The Mirena is placed in the uterus so neither you or your partner should be able to feel the device during intercourse. Mirena is an IUD that release small amounts of a progestin hormone called levonorgestrel into the uterus. This hormone thickens the cervicl mucus to prevent sperm from entering your uterus, thereby inhibiting it from reaching or fertilizing the egg. See more children in your future but aren’t ready yet? Or maybe your family is just the right size but you’re not ready for permanent birth control. Either way, Mirena might be right for you if you want birth control that is:

Highly effective — One of the most effective birth control methods—over 99% at preventing pregnancy Low-maintenance — No daily pills and no monthly refills. It lasts as long as you want, for up to 5 years. The timeframe is up to you. You should do a monthly thread check to make sure it’s in place. Ask your healthcare provider to explain how. You should schedule a follow-up visit 4 to 6 weeks after your Mirena is placed to check that it’s in the right position Reversible — You can have it removed by your healthcare provider at any time, and try to become pregnant right away Estrogen-free — It delivers small amounts of progestin locally into your uterus

Approved to treat heavy periods—Mirena is the first and only IUD (intrauterine device) birth control that is FDA-approved to treat heavy periods in women who choose intrauterine birth control No birth control is right for everyone, so talk to your healthcare provider! They can help you decide if Mirena is the right choice for you.

  1. There is a very slight risk of getting pregnant, less than 1 percent.
  2. This is still the lowest risk of pregnancy of any form of birth control.
  3. If you do conceive while using Mirena, you’re at a higher risk of an ectopic pregnancy, when the fertilized egg implants outside the uterus.
  4. Still, because Mirena prevents most pregnancies, the risk of having an ectopic pregnancy is far lower than women who are not using contraception.

There is a slight risk that the insertion of Mirena causes perforation of the uterus. Typical side effects associated with Mirena include:

Headache Acne Breast tenderness Irregular bleeding (this usually improves after the first six months of use) Mood changes Cramping or pelvic pain

There is a chance of expelling Mirena from your uterus. This is more typical if Mirena was inserted immediately after childbirth. Most women have some degree of fear and trepidation about having an IUD inserted. After all, it must be painful to have something inserted through your cervix and into your uterus, right? Not necessarily. Our Premier OB/GYN patients find the pain tolerable and feel the tradeoff is well worth it for having this highly effective method of birth control in place. Once inserted, there’s nothing you need to do with Mirena, and it can stay in place for up to 5 years.

  • If you had Mirena inserted within 7 days after the start of your period, it is effective immediately.
  • If it is inserted at any other time during your menstrual cycle, Mirena will start working 7 days after it is inserted.
  • So, for that first week after insertion, you need to use condoms or continue your pills, patch, or other birth control as a backup.

After we insert Mirena, you must not have sex or use tampons for 24 hours. Also, don’t use a hot tub, take a bath, or use a swimming pool. You may have some on and off cramping for 24 hours, so you may want to take it easy. This isn’t a requirement, however.

Do not pull on the strings, as this can dislodge Mirena. The strings are only there to assure you the IUD is in place. Women can only feel Mirena if it has descended and they are feeling the hard plastic. You can feel the strings that descend out of the cervix, but that is only if you try and feel them.

At, we feel Mirena and other IUDs have some serious advantages over other forms of birth control. They are truly low-maintenance — No daily pills to take; no patches to replace; no condoms or diaphragms to put on or insert. Once placed by your Premier OB/GYN doctor, your Mirena IUD won’t need any attention.

Eliminates the need to interrupt sex for contraception Doesn’t require partner participation Can remain in place for 5 years Can be removed at any time, which will return you to fertility very quickly Can be used while breastfeeding Doesn’t carry the risk of side effects related to birth control methods containing estrogen Typically decreases menstrual bleeding at three or four months after placement About one-fifth of women stop having periods after one year of using Mirena Can decrease menstrual pain and pain associated with endometriosis Decreases risk of pelvic infection Decreases risk of endometrial cancer

About 5 percent of women on Mirena gain weight, but this varies widely between different women. The weight gain isn’t an increase in body fat. Instead, progestin, the hormone used in Mirena, can make your body hold onto more water and cause some bloating.

Is it normal to bleed heavy after 1 year of IUD?

An intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective, long lasting form of birth control. However, it can cause you to experience a heavier-than-typical period. IUDs are generally safe to use, but like other forms of birth control, you may experience some unwanted side effects.

Copper (ParaGard) IUDs: These are plastic devices wrapped in coiled copper. They only need to be replaced every 10 years and have a failure rate of about 0.8%. Hormonal IUDs : These include Mirena, Skyla, Kyleena, and Liletta. They contain the hormone progestin and must be replaced every 3 to 8 years. They have a failure rate of about 0.1-0.4%.

Copper IUDs release a small number of copper ions into the tissue of your uterus, which creates an inflammatory response. This response makes the environment less welcoming to the egg and sperm. Copper is also toxic to sperm, so if any do reach the egg, they will likely be unable to fertilize successfully.

  • Hormonal IUDs work similarly, but they use progesterone to prevent fertilization.
  • While they can cause abnormal bleeding for about 3-6 months following implantation, you will likely experience lighter periods after this transition period.
  • IUDs do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

You may still want to use condoms with new sexual partners and get regular testing for STIs to help prevent infections. Learn more about choosing the right IUD, The cost of an IUD can vary from $0 dollars out of pocket to around $1,000, according to the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC).

  1. If you have health insurance, the Affordable Care Act requires the insurance company to cover the full cost.
  2. They cannot charge you copays or other expenses related to birth control as long as you go through an in-network provider.
  3. The NWLC warns, however, that while they need to cover both copper and hormone IUDs, they do not need to cover every type.

While you may be able to use any option available with no issues, you may run into an issue if a doctor recommends you use a type your insurance does not cover. If your insurance does not cover the specific type of IUD you need, or you do not have insurance, a local health clinic may be able to provide a lower-cost option.

discomfort during or shortly following placementexpulsion of the IUDcrampingheavier or longer than typical periodspassing blood clots with an IUD

More specific side effects vary depending on the type of IUD. Copper IUDs often cause heavy bleeding. They can also cause an increase in cramping and backaches during monthly periods in some people. These side effects are not unusual or necessarily a reason for concern.

In a 2018 study, researchers noted that heavy bleeding within the first year following implantation represented a primary cause of discontinuation of the device. They also found in their study that heavy menstrual bleeding before insertion puts a person at a higher risk of discontinuation within a year.

Your period with IUD after 1 year may return to typical levels. But you may continue to experience heavy or irregular bleeding after a year with a copper IUD. Hormonal IUDs typically have the opposite effect. Periods often become lighter and less painful or may go away entirely.

How do you know if Mirena is working?

Change in character of periods – When the Mirena coil is in place it generally results in lighter periods or no periods at all, as explained above. If, suddenly, “proper” periods occur after a period of experiencing lighter or no periods, this means that the womb lining has been allowed to thicken normally and shed to produce menstrual bleeding.

  1. This could indicate Mirena failure, because the levonorgestrel is not having the desired effect.
  2. However, during the first 3-6 months of having the Mirena inserted, irregular periods (frequent, heavy periods alternating with infrequent, light periods) are common, and does not necessarily mean the coil is not working — it is simply because the body is adjusting to the effect of the Mirena.

One suggestion is that the imbalance in the body between progesterone and oestrogen caused when the Mirena is inserted causes the womb lining to be fragile, and therefore more likely to bleed and cause irregular bleeding. If there is a sudden change in the bleeding pattern, particularly heavy periods, it is worth getting this investigated as it may be due to other causes such as infection or expulsion of the Mirena.